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LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF NOV 28TH

12/01/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Nov 28th CSA Box Contents Week of Nov 28th

Medium Box
Broccoli
Carrot, Rainbow
Citrus, Oranges
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Mustard
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Pepper, Poblano
Pepper, Sweet Medley
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Watermelon

2016 HOLIDAY GIFT BANNER

12/01/16 — Farm

holiday-gift-banner

FIRST FRIDAY STAFF PICKS - DECEMBER EDITION

12/02/16 — Heydon Hatcher

The beginning of a new month means another highly-anticipated installment of our First Friday Staff Picks! We love sharing events, adventures, and side projects that inspire and excite us (food-related or not) with our community. Check out our JBG staff-curated list of favorites below!

Charlotte and Chucha. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Charlotte and Chucha. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Travis, Wholesale Manager: December 2nd & 3rd is Oozefest! It's a two day sludge, noise and gaze festival at Beerland, where 50% of the proceeds benefit Planned Parenthood. Weak Flesh and Terse are playing, and they always bring the heat. Definitely check it out!

Ada, Marketing and CSA Manager: All the photos of Heydon, Mike, Travis, and Brenton in turkey costumes. Pure gold!

 


Turnip soup! Specifically, the delectable combination of (get ready for this) white Japanese turnips, asparagus, mushrooms, turnip greens, fish stock, oysters, and cream that my dad made for Thanksgiving. C'est si bon! But really, any version of turnip soup is hitting the spot these days. This is a pretty good base. Temps have dropped, and it's finally gumbo season! Act now, and add some of our peppers, green onions, and parsley to your pot for locally-sourced goodness. Promise it will taste better.

My favorite bluegrass boys (men), Wood and Wire, just announced that they're playing an intimate show on 12/17 at Strange Brew. Even better, part of the proceeds are headed to a local charity.

Kenny, Farm Administrator: December means my parents are coming to town to visit and that means I get to gleefully field their disdain with 90% of Austin's culinary offerings and instead take them to Cracker Barrel! 

Also, one of mine and Andrew's favorite bands, Earthless is coming to town again, 12/7 at Barracuda. Perfect on perfect, here's one of my favorite comics, Bill Burr, describing what an Earthless show is like. Basically, one giant arena rock outro!

Charlotte, Assistant Farm Manager: We're going to see Jim James at ACL Live in a couple weeks! His new album is a sparkling brood-fest with as many layers as my winter farm attire (a lot), perfect for these short December days.

I'm obsessed with pickling all of our multicolored radishes right now, which I use to top a simple veggie and rice bowl with a fried egg several times a week.

I did most of my Christmas shopping at EAST, but I'm picking up a few last minute Austin-themed things from local design collective Frankie Jean. Definitely check them out if you're into clean, meaningful design!

Brandon and I recently got our tintype portrait taken by photographer, Adrian Whipp.

 



Got our tintype portrait done this weekend with @lumiere_tintype

A photo posted by Brandon Mallonee (@bmallonee) on


And last but not least, Dr. Strange is well worth a watch, especially in 3D.

Michael, Wholesale Manager: I am really into Yolanda's tacos at Taco Guerrero on Cesar Chavez and Pleasant Valley right now. Also, super excited to make Kimchi with JBG Napa cabbage.​

Matt, CSA Manager: Weary Boys this weekend at Continental Club, and Steve Earle there later this month. It's a tiny venue to see him as he usually plays the Paramount. I doubt I'll get out to either show, but should be good ones!

Heydon, Blog Writer: My multi-talented and magnificent friend, Mandy Lyne, just launched her new jewelry line, InVenetus. Check it out and subscribe to her instagram... beautiful and timeless pieces inspired by the ancients. Could be a great holiday gift, too!

Austin Animal Center. My boyfriend and I just acquired the new love of our lives, Ocotillo Romo (named after a type of cactus in West Texas that enchanted us by it's novelty and general oddity and, duh, Tony Romo after his amazing show of magnanimity re: Dak Prescott). I highly recommend anyone who is looking for a new canine companion to visit the Town Lake shelter.

 
pt. II // late night cowboy and his stone cold companion, oco. ?

A photo posted by heydon (@heydopotato) on



Yoga with Adriene. These free online classes have been a mainstay in my daily routine for over a year now. I highly recommend checking out her library of videos - catered to all body types, body ailments, energy levels, and mental states. Whether you have ten minutes or an hour, you can get a stretch in!

Farm, in general: Don't miss the upcoming Taste and Learn event at Barr Mansion.  If you're an heirloom enthusiast or want to learn how to grow and cook delicious greens, don't miss this.  One of our favorite seed reps from Kitazawa will be there, to boot! More info here.

Holiday at the Farm! Don't miss out on the most festive farm event yet!

WEEK 48 IN PHOTOS

12/02/16 — Heydon Hatcher

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We are seriously relishing these dazzling and frosty winter mornings. The first slight frost of the season arrived yesterday morning... the sparkly frost brings a little bit of magic to the farm. We've been planting leeks and onions all week, and are taking this month to plan and prepare for the quickly approaching planting season in 2017. We can't believe it's almost time to talk tomatoes again!

Have you bought tickets to Holiday on the Farm? Shoot be a hollerin' good time! Find more info here.

**farm update/contributions from Charlotte McClure

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

HOLIDAY ON THE FARM BANNER

12/02/16 — Farm

the-grinch-banner

 

HOLIDAY FARM BANNER (TAKE 2)

12/02/16 — Farm

the-grinch-banner

VEGAN BROCCOLI SOUP

12/06/16 — Heydon Hatcher

by Hector Gonzalez

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Vegan Broccoli Soup
  • 3-5 broccoli stalks. You can add florets but I’m saving mine for a stir fry
  • 1 tbsp of olive oil. If you want a buttery flavor, @conolio has a butter olive oil that is ACTUALLY vegan! Ask them about it!
  • 1/2 onion, diced. You can add more or less. It’s your choice
  • 2 garlic cloves, diced. Same ^^ advice applies. If you like your garlicky, go ahead, add a whole head!
  • 1 cup of vegetable broth. I had some mushroom broth saved and used that. You can add more broth to make it less creamy
  • Salt & pepper to taste


Steam or boil your stalks until tender. Give it 20-25 minutes.

In the meantime, sauté the onions first until translucent and then add the garlic. Add salt and pepper at this point to infuse the oil.

Put all ingredients in the blender and blend until smooth.

Top with broccoli greens, your favorite breads/crackers, and a dash of spice. I used chipotle powder.

Wear your favorite pair of warm socks and enjoy!

FROM THE FARMER'S PERSPECTIVE: ALL THE WAY TO MONTERREY

12/06/16 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Well, we’re back on the farm after taking a rare (and well-deserved) long weekend for Thanksgiving! When I realized I had three days stretching ahead of me with no farm work to take care of, I had to take advantage of it. Having recently acquired a passport for my trip to Italy, Mexico immediately popped into my mind. I checked the map and the city of Monterrey was a straight shot down I-35, only six hours away. Perfect.

If you’ve never traveled alone, I highly recommend it. There are few things more freeing than heading to an unknown destination with zero itinerary and unlimited possibilities. I listened to Mexican radio stations as I drove, trying to pick up some Spanish last-minute. I drove across the border and was stopped a few miles later by a cop who wanted to see my paperwork. Apparently, I had almost none of the proper documentation for my truck. With the help of our Operations Manager, Krishna, back in Austin, we sorted out the issue and I was back on my way four confusing hours later. To avoid my mistake, you can find a list of necessary documents here. You should definitely make an appointment to get your vehicle permit at a consulate in the US if you do decide to make the drive.

Once in Monterrey, I checked into the Hotel Safi, a five-star hotel just South of the city’s center. I could not believe my eyes when I walked into the lobby. The ceiling must have been fifty feet high! The hotel had a pool with a slide surrounded by gardens, which I’m sure kids would love. For under a hundred bucks a night, this place is an awesome deal.

I spent the rest of the weekend basically eating my way through the city. I visited the farmers markets where the air was thick with the scent of smoked chilis, cheeses, and masa cooking on hot griddles. Piles of what looked like spiced insects caught my eye, which I learned are a local delicacy called chapolinas (roasted grasshoppers). The quality and abundance of locally produced goods was astonishing. Vendors were selling everything from verduras (fresh vegetables) to handmade gorditas in clay pots and freshly squeezed orange juice. Tiny trucks drove by piled high with roasted chilis and long braids of freshly harvested garlic from the nearby city of San Luis Potosi. (See more photos below!)

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Chapolinas! Photo by Brenton Johnson. Chapolinas! Photo by Brenton Johnson.

For dinner on Saturday, I ate at a small restaurant called La Familia. I had an incredible warm avocado salad with wild arugula followed by the best chicken molé I’ve ever tasted, all accompanied by a stack of handmade corn tortillas. For dessert, I treated myself to chocolate cake with a molten chocolate center topped with ice cream. I felt like a king, but this incredible meal hardly cost me anything.

The food, the hotel, the people, and the markets were all incredible. I didn’t see a single American the entire weekend. Monterrey is pretty modern and I felt just as safe as I would in any American city. There are millions of people living peacefully in Monterrey, and it’s right there for us to explore. It’s just a six hour drive away!

When I crossed the border back into the US, the guard asked me what I’d been doing in Monterrey. I told him I went to see the farmers markets, and he looked at me like I was crazy. Believe me though, the markets alone are worth the trip.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

Photo by Brenton Johnson. Photo by Brenton Johnson.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 5TH

12/06/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 5th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 5th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Green Neck
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Potato, Sweet
Small Box
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Braising Mix
Greens, Kale, Dino
Herb, Fennel
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Radish, Watermelon
Individual Box
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Mustard
Herb, Fennel
Turnip, Scarlett

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 5TH

12/06/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 5th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 5th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green

CHEESY HERB RICE STUFFED POBLANOS

12/06/16 — Heydon Hatcher

img_4160

by Megan Winfrey

The herbs have arrived! Want to liven up the standard chicken and rice, soup, or salad? Look no further then your friends dill, parsley, cilantro, and mint. A spattering of fresh, chopped herbs is like magic fairy dust for your meal - taking it from boring to bangin' with a simple flick of the wrist. I, myself, am guilty of herb murder, as I'm sure many of you are. I carefully take out my herbs, trim the stems, place them in a glass of water, let them shrivel up in the fridge, then brokenheartedly toss them out. In an effort to break this cycle, I vowed to use all of the herbs that came in my CSA box this week, and I did! Each meal was a bit more delicious than usual, and herb lives were saved. Win, win.

Cheesy Herb Rice Stuffed Poblanos
  • 4 poblano peppers, tops trimmed and de-seeded
  • 2 cups rice, cooked
  • 1 1/2 cups mozzarella cheese, shredded
  • 2 tbs. dill, chopped
  • 2 tbs. parsley, chopped
  • 1 tbs. cumin
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Avocado, for serving
img_4156

Preheat the oven to 400.

Cook the rice according to the package instructions. While the rice is cooking, prepare the peppers for stuffing and line them on a baking sheet. Once the rice is done, mix in the herbs, cumin, and 1 cup of cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste.

Stuff the peppers, packing the rice down with a spoon as you go. Bake the peppers until tender, about 30-35 minutes. Sprinkle the rest of the cheese over the peppers, and broil on high until the cheese is bubbly.

If desired, serve with avocado on the side to help cut the heat of the peppers.

WEEK 49 IN PHOTOS

12/09/16 — Heydon Hatcher

Travis and the radishes. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Travis veggin' out. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brr! Winter has finally graced Central Texas and we are packin’ on the layers for these frosty early mornings. We are huddled up in the office working on crop plans for the impending planting season as well as a long-term crop rotation plan. We are in the peak of harvest season and overflowing with tons and tons of crops. Come see the cornucopia of fall vegetables for yourself at our markets!

Don’t forget: Holiday at the Farm is this weekend, and we've got a very exciting update regarding the event! The screening will take place in our Greenhouses! Ever watched a movie, snuggled up in a greenhouse? Neither have we! It's going to be quite magical, and we hope you'll join us. Tickets on sale now.

If you are reeling in the holiday rush with no time for shopping, check out our gift ideas here. We hope it helps!

CSA box hypnosis. Photo by Scott David Gordon. CSA box hypnosis. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Fennel fun. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fennel fun. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

161208_sdg306180 Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

161208_sdg306218 Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brenton and Charlotte. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton and Charlotte. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

FROM THE FARMER'S PERSPECTIVE: WINTER WONDERPLAN

12/09/16 — Heydon Hatcher

img_1851 Brenton, 20 years ago today...

We’ve really shifted gears this week at the farm. For the past two months, we’ve toiled tirelessly getting all the crops in the ground… and just in the nick of time, as we finished fall planting right before the influx of chilly temps and rain. With a major and welcomed change of pace, we are desk-bound inside, working on crop planning for the upcoming planting season, and also, for the first time, on a long-term crop rotation plan. This task becomes easier to fixate on when we aren’t directing all of our energy to farm expansion efforts as we have done in the past. We are embracing this deviation from our usual outside-all-day lifestyle with newfound fervor, and enjoying the excuse to huddle up inside in this awesome wintry weather. We have all of our favorite books scattered all over our desks and are gettin’ after it! And this year, we’re opening up our planning to your input! We’ll be sending out a survey soon so we can make sure we’re growing all your favorite crops.

Books on books on books. Books on books on books.

Currently, we are in the peak of our harvest season, so the barn is a madhouse. JBG folks are working until 4 AM and another shift has been arriving at 5 AM. It’s almost a 24-hour operation. Can you believe it? The volume of produce arriving by the truckload is immensely overwhelming. Every Wednesday, our sales folks come out and take inventory with me and our harvest manager, Vicente. We feel like we are at a standstill sometimes... Where do we start? What should we sell? There’s so much of everything. To help answer these questions, Charlotte, our Assistant Farm Manager, started working on a decision-making matrix. She went home last Friday night and stayed up until 11 pm sucked into the intricacies of the spreadsheet, figuring out how to work it most effectively. At the beginning of this week, she came in with her final product and shared it with me. I was SO thrilled about it. It was even better than I had imagined.

Charlotte, crop planning. Charlotte, crop planning.

This new tool helps our wholesale team decide what is most profitable to sell with the least amount of effort, with many important factors integrated like labor and packing costs and how urgently the crop needs to be sold (whether it’s hanging out in the field for a long time, or if it’s ripe and ready now). Depending on how these components interact, the crop will either go up or down on Travis and Mike Mo’s list. It will also increase the overall quality of the product since we have a closer eye on what’s pressing and needs to be sold right away.

Sales meeting. Sales staff out at the farm - meeting of the minds.

We are also making a ton of changes on how we manage the harvest, too. Previously, Vicente, our Harvest Manager, kept track of everything in his head along with a little notebook. With this system we would run into a couple of snafus since we weren’t basing our decisions on concrete information in front of us. We would harvest more than we could sell and vice versa. This year, Krishna, our Operations Manager, came up with an Excel-based harvest management tool, and we are rockin’ it to say the least. It’s a spreadsheet on steroids with tons of muscle beneath the hood, and we can’t imagine doing our work without it now.

Speaking of harvests, we have a whole deluge of fresh, new crops that are headin’ market-way and CSA customers will start to see trickling into their shares. New radishes: green meat, green neck, purple daikon, and black spanish. We've been harvesting Napa cabbage all week, too, and it's never looked better. We loved this post by a farm in NY that listed not 1, but 6 ways to use Napa. Several employees here have found this kimchi recipe to be their go-to... no better way to preserve this delectable (and short-lived) crop! A look ahead: In the impending planting season, we are going to offer an even more varied assortment of tomatoes, plus, carrots bunched by color in the new year! Stay posted… more to come!

Photo by Scott David Gordon.

 


Don’t forget: Holiday at the Farm is this weekend! We’re excited to announce that we’ve decided to move the Grinch screening to inside our greenhouses. t will be the coziest movie you ever did see. You won’t want to miss this awesome and festive event: Cindy Lou-Who look-alike contest, okra ornament decorations, dance party, food truck treats, face-paintings... goodness me, what else could you want? Once the kids have exhausted themselves from all the activity, we will all cozy up with blankets and hot chocolate to revel in the delight of the big screen.

It's December, and of course that means holidays galore. If you're doing any holiday shopping, we encourage you to consider a gift from the farm, like market bucks or even a CSA subscription (remind me, what is CSA?). Even though our harvests our at their peak, sometimes the CSA can slow a bit in the holiday season, because members are traveling, or are just extraordinarily busy with the holiday shuffle. So, when you buy holiday gifts from us, you're not only purchasing a truly unique and thoughtful gift, but you’re also helping us at a time when things are a bit slower. On top of that, when you give someone the promise of fresh and local vegetables, you're setting your loved ones up for a healthier and happier new year. CSA Members: Don't forget you can donate your CSA share instead of postponing it this season... it's easy! Just shoot us an e-mail.

RESTAURANT PACKING CREW

12/13/16 — Farm

Photo by Scott David Grodon Photo by Scott David Grodon

Position Title: Restaurant Packing Crew Location: Hergotz Lane Department: Wholesale Reports To: Wholesale Packing Manager Supervises: n/a

Position Summary:

JBG is currently seeking a dependable and hardworking individual to join our Wholesale Packing Crew. This crew is responsible for washing, processing, and packing vegetables harvested on the farm, with their primary focus being Wholesale orders. Efficiency is key is this position, though the team  is also responsible for ensuring the highest level of produce quality, order accuracy, and compliance with health regulations. They will work closely with the Wholesale Sales Manager and other department teams to guarantee that operations and orders are completed correctly and in a timely manner. This includes working as a team with other departments when the demands arise.  All farm employees are expected to be courteous, demonstrate a strong work ethic and attention to detail. We take pride on the farm in producing the highest quality vegetables through quality work.

Responsibilities
  • Receive, process, and package vegetables harvested on the farm
  • Maintain a clean and sanitary working environment
  • Ensure quality of all produce
  • Prepare and package wholesale orders
  • Communicate with other teams regarding workload and quality to ensure highest quality and improve systems over time
Qualifications Required
  • No previous experience required, only a desire to learn farm work
  • Keen sense of detail and ability to apply this to packing standards
  • A mantra that “Teamwork doesn’t seem work!”
  • Flexibility - hours and responsibilities may change due to seasonal demands or other farm happenings, and willingness to work late hours is essential
Preferred
  • Previous experience in a warehouse setting, or with produce standards.
Physical Requirements
  • Ability to repeatedly lift 50lbs
  • Ability to repeatedly kneel, bend, and squat
  • Ability to withstand exposure to varying weather conditions
  • Ability to withstand prolonged standing or walking
Typical Schedule:

PM Crew: Monday-Wednesday: 3:30 pm - 1:30 am, Thursday-Friday: 3:30 pm - 11:00pm

Compensation & Benefits: Payment is $10 / hour, paid bi-weekly.  Permanent employees are eligible for Individual Health Plan benefits. All JBG employees receive a weekly medium share of vegetables and a dozen eggs bi-weekly.

Directions for Applying:

Please send an email to jobs@jbgorganic.com with the following format. Following specific directions is the first way to impress us!
  • Subject Line should read “[Job Title]: [First Initial]_[Last Name]” … For example, “Planting Crew Coordinator: J_Smith”
  • Email body should be short & sweet - help us notice you! Ensure that it contains your contact information.
  • Attach three documents to your email, ensuring that their file names are clear: 1) Cover Letter 2) Resume 3) List containing contact information of two professional references
Thank you for your interest in JBG Organic! You will be contacted for further information if we find that you might be a good fit for this position.

The responsibilities & duties listed above are intended to communicate general priorities of this position, but should not be understood as an exhaustive list of all work requirements to be completed at JBG Organic. Farms require flexibility! We are committed to training, developing, and promoting from within the company based on performance. JBG Organic provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, marital status, or sexual orientation.

PART TIME RESTAURANT DRIVER

12/13/16 — Farm

130808_SDG171488

Johnson’s Backyard Garden (JBG) is seeking an experienced candidate to assume responsibility as a part-time Wholesale Driver. The Wholesale Driver will work closely with our sales managers to ensure that all deliveries are made in a timely manner.

JBG offers the opportunity for community members to be provided with the best quality, locally grown, organic vegetables possible. In just 10 years, the farm went from a 30x50ft garden in an urban backyard in East Austin to a now 205-acre organic vegetable farm based on a Community Supported Agriculture (CSA) model.  Our CSA has now grown to more than 1,700 members in four major metropolises and we provide fresh, year-round, organic produce to CSA members, multiple farmers markets, local restaurants and grocery retailers, including major chains like Whole Foods and HEB/Central Market.

Responsibilities
  • Delivers daily orders to local restaurants, food processors, and grocery stores in a JBG van or box truck, Tuesday and Wednesday mornings from 7am-1pm.  Hours may vary slightly from week to week, depending on orders.
  • Checks all orders to ensure quality of produce
  • Checks all invoices to ensure order is complete before delivering
  • Occasionally packs late orders for customers and delivers
Qualifications
  • Ability and experience driving a variety of vehicles, including large trucks, and manual or automatic transmission (CDL not required, but preferred)
  • Valid TX driver’s license with a clean driving record
  • Experience using a forklift and a pallet jack
  • Able to work morning shifts as early as 6:00am
  • Self-directed and independent worker
  • An interest in agriculture and promotion of local and organic farming highly preferred
Physical Requirements
  • Ability to lift 60 pounds and mobility to ascend and descend the rear end of a box truck.
  • Ability to load trucks in a timely manner to ensure earliest delivery possible
  • Ability to work outdoors in a variety of weather conditions
Compensation and Benefits
    • Compensation is dependent on experience. Expected salary range is $11/hour.
To apply, please send a resume and two professional references to jobs@jbgorganic.com with “Driver” in the subject line.

Johnson’s Backyard Garden’s provides equal employment opportunities regardless of race, color, religion, gender, sex, age, national origin, disability, marital status, or sexual orientation.  The duties listed above are general and not an exhaustive list of tasks performed on the farm. We are committed to training, developing, and promoting from within the company based on performance.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 12TH

12/13/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 12th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 12th

Large Box
Beet, Golden
Broccoli
Cabbage, Napa
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Mustard
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Parsley, Curly
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, Scarlett
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Mustard
Herb, Parsley, Curly
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, Purple Top
Small Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Black Spanish
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Watermelon

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 12TH

12/13/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 12th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 12th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Potato, Sweet

RADISH BURGER PATTIES

12/13/16 — Heydon Hatcher

161208_sdg306298-1by Hector Gonzalez

Radish Burger Patties
  • 2 cups of shredded radishes
  • Chopped greens from radishes
  • 1 cup of shredded potato (sweet potatoes work too!)
  • ½ cornmeal
  • ½ coconut flour (or any other non-wheat flour you prefer)
  • 1 tsp black pepper
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 cup of tahini or more


Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl

Add tahini until the mix is malleable enough to form thin patties. Add as much tahini as needed. Place in a tray and put in the fridge for 10 minutes

Heat a skillet to medium high heat with your favorite vegetable oil. Fry patties for 4 minutes each side of until browned

Serve with hot sauce or in burger buns

BROCCOLI CHEESE SOUP + KALE CHIPS

12/14/16 — Heydon Hatcher

by Megan Winfrey

When I think about comfort food, I think of this dish. Because what is more comforting that melted cheddar cheese? I actually recommend doubling this recipe rather than end up like me, wanting a third helping for the final 20 minutes of Love Actually, just to realize my husband had scraped the pot clean. Don't be like me. Be smart, and double it.

Broccoli Cheese Soup
  • 1 tbs. olive oil
  • 1 small onion, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, diced
  • 4 tbs. butter
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 2 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 2 cups half and half
  • 3 heaping cups of broccoli florets + optional stems
  • 2 large or 4 small carrots, sliced into half moons
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. paprika or smoked paprika
  • 1/2 tsp. dry mustard powder
  • 8 oz. medium cheddar cheese, grated
img_4217

In a large dutch oven, add the olive oil and diced onion. Cook over medium heat until translucent and starting to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook for another minute. Remove into a bowl and set aside.

Add the butter to the pan and allow to melt. Add the flour and cook over medium, whisking constantly, until the flour has thickened. This could take 4-6 minutes, and the roux will be medium brown in color. When roux has thickened but still fluid, slowly add the stock and the half and half, whisking constantly.

Bring to a boil, then reduce to a low simmer. Allow to simmer for 15-20 minutes until the soup has thickened a bit. Whisk intermittently to combine and break up the 'skin' that forms on top. While the soup simmers, prepare the broccoli and carrots. After the 15-20 minutes, add the broccoli, carrots, and the onion and garlic you set aside to the soup. Add the salt, pepper, paprika, and mustard powder and stir to combine.

Allow the soup to simmer over low heat for 20-25 minutes, thickening up.

While the soup simmers, grate the cheese. Use a medium to high quality cheddar, as the flavor of the soup depends on it. Don't use pre-grated cheese, it will not melt properly. After the 20-25 minutes, add most of the cheese, reserving some for garnish. Stir until smooth.

Transfer the soup to bowls with a ladle, garnish with cheese and optional kale chips (recipe below), and serve immediately.

Kale Chips

Preheat oven to 200ºF

Thoroughly wash a bunch of dinosaur kale and chop into 2-3" pieces. Let dry. Put them in a large bowl, add 1 tbs. olive oil and fresh cracked sea salt to taste (you don't need much). Lay the kale out end to end onto large baking sheets. They can be touching, but not overlapping. Bake for 60 minutes.

GET YOUR GIFT ON: JBG'S GIFT GUIDE FOR THE ULTIMATE LOCAVORE

12/15/16 — Heydon Hatcher

From the home chef who has it all, to your uncle who just learned what a kohlrabi is, we've scoured every corner of our fair town of Austin to bring you the ultimate shopping guide for your local-eatin’ loved ones. Keeping your dollars local this holiday season will not only support local businesses, but also will make for unique, quality, and thoughtful gifts to enjoy either on your plate or in the years to come.

So happy shopping, but most of all, happy holidays!

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1. JBG Veggies... and More!

We couldn't make this list without putting some of our own farm gifts on it! This holiday we have more options than ever to bring some of the farm straight to your loved ones:
  • CSA Gift Subscription: Choose from one week to a full year of organic JBG veggies, delivered! Our CSA gift subscriptions are flexible and easy to redeem, plus you'll get to reap the benefits as well when you get invited over for that delicious home cooked meal!
  • Market Bucks: Not sure what they want? Market Bucks are a fail-safe way to make sure your recipient gets exactly what they need. These can be used to buy veggies at market, on JBG merchandise, or they can save them in preparation for our Spring Transplant Sale to get their own backyard garden rockin' this spring!
  • Sponsored Shares: Giving a gift in someone's name might be the coolest way to support local businesses, local nonprofits, and the giving spirit this holiday. Donated produce shares go directly to The Settlement Home and SafePlace. These donations help feed Texan children and young adults with histories of trauma and abuse. Each donated share comes with a handwritten card from our farmer, notifying the recipient of their gift and thanking them.
  • Holiday on the Farm: Give someone an experience, and snag them tickets to our December 10th Holiday on the Farm Event. Perfect for the kiddos and families on your list. We’re screening How the Grinch Stole Christmas right on the farm! There will be hot chocolate, hay rides, and a whole lot more.
  • Have a family friend who loves citrus? Give the gift of some vitamin C! 
Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

2. Cooking Classes Galore!

Have a friend who wants to delve deeper into a certain style of cooking? Gift someone the chance to expand their culinary arsenal.
  • Kitchen Underground - A collective of all kinds of foodies, check out their menu of assorted classes here. You will find yourself not only acquiring new skills, but also new cooking comrades... all taking place in authentic and intimate spaces. We’ve had our eyes on the bread-making class for a long time.
  • Dai Due’s New School of Traditional Cookery - This exquisite restaurant offers a range of classes that focus on wild game, whether you want to learn about hunting and processing or you just want to learn the finer points of cooking a gosh darn delicious flank of steak. Check out all the varied syllabi here.
 

One spot left for Bread Baking w @maggiecperkins tomorrow night!! Link in profile for class! #austineats #cookingclass #eatlocal #breadbaking

A photo posted by Kitchen Underground (@kitchen_underground) on





3. Locally Purveyed Goodness

If you're anything like us, you LOVE to try new goodies from Austin's creative food artisans. Why not spread some love with some preserves from Stephanie at Confituras, spice up a conversation with some hot sauce from Yellowbird, or pack a probiotic punch with a bottle of Hat Creek Pickles? Once the overwhelmingly delectable tastes of locally artisanal treats wash over them, they'll thank you.

Photo from Hat Creek Provisions. Photo from Hat Creek Provisions.

4. Dreamy Kitchen Tools for the Home Chef

Have a friend who loves design just as much as hosting a locally sourced dinner party? These two suggestions below are sure to please.
  • Kettle & Brine - A locally owned kitchen boutique catered to the consumer whose love for good design is rivaled only by their deep-seated love of food. Visit their beautifully curated store, and you will definitely come home with something for your chef-friend. Peruse their gift gallery here.
  • Work by Nonny - Amanda Rivera creates elegant and uncommon pieces from vases to tumblers. Perfect adornments for your kitchen table. Check her work out here.
Photo courtesy of Kettle & Brine. Photo courtesy of Kettle & Brine.

5. Holiday Libations? Yes, Please.

Living in Austin has infinite perks, one of which is the diverse spread of local craft breweries and distilleries. Treat a friend to bottle of Waterloo Gin, or better yet, a day trip to Treaty Oak Distilling’s picturesque ranch, where you can explore their wide-ranging menu of high-quality spirits. They usually have live music and delectable bites to boot. While you’re out on Fitzhugh Road, you might as well extend the visit to include the inimitable Jester King Brewery as well! You won't regret it!

Rather stay in town? Grab a gift card from ABGB. They sling some of the most delicious pizza in town with GABF award-winning beers to wash it down… not to mention, they are some of the nicest people we know.

Photo from Treaty Oak Distilling. Photo from Treaty Oak Distilling.

6. The Finer Things in Life: Plants

A leafy friend is always the best friend, or at least that’s what our crazy plant lady buddy always tells us. Lose yourself in the verdant nurseries below, browsing the oasis of perennials, tropicals, succulents, herbs, vegetables and fruit trees! On top of the plethora of plants, they have an abundance of soils, all sizes of pots, watering cans, and smiles all around.


New houseplants waiting for you! Including Fiddle Leaf Figs- and these things sell fast!!

A photo posted by Tillery Street Plant Company (@tillerystplantco) on


7. All Things Callahan’s

We can't help ourselves, we live and breathe the family-owned and Austin legend, Callahan’s General Store. It’s got quite literally everything. We know because they are our down-the-street neighbors! Check 'em out after you volunteer with us!
  • Canning Supplies - they've got everything you or a friend need to get start preserving at home! While you’re at it, check out their houseware section for all kinds of holiday gift ideas!
  • Cookbooks Galore - Don’t know how to make preserves? Don’t fret, grab a book on preserving from their extensive selection of cookbooks!
  • Western Wear - Have an uncle who loves cowboy hats and boots? An aunt who has an affinity for pearl snaps and bedazzled belts? Look no further, Callahan’s clothing section has you covered.
  • Baby Chicks? Goats? Pigs? Bunnies? - Got an animal lover in the family? Head on over and check out all the different breeds of animals, they have quite the selection.
Photo courtesy of Callahan's. Photo courtesy of Callahan's.

8. Giving Back to the Community!

Feeling the need to give back to the community this holiday season? We salute you, and have a couple of suggestions if you are more inclined to donate to local farms. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

9. All About the Hats!

If you are looking for the perfect cap for your hat-crazed friend, look no further!
  • The newest hat from our favorite graphic designers, Land. Man, are they talented! Check out their other work, too, while you’re at it.
  • Avid sports fan? Country music aficionado? You want your headgear to reflect your awesome tastes? Check out some vintage caps from Hats What She Said or Waterboy Vintage! Peruse their many varied, blast-from-the-past head wear…
  • Make a farm-fresh statement and grab one of our JBG caps! It's a great addition to anyone's wardrobe.
Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

10. Pig Out and Work Out!

If you or your loved ones are already feeling the holiday libations and savory provisions weighing you down, relish in the festivities now and give the gift of post-holiday fitness in the New Year.
  • Rogue Running Training Programs - Whether you’ve never run before or you've finished a handful of marathons, Rogue offers many different training programs curated for every type of runner. Dust off your running shoes and check out all the different options here. If you’re running with friends, you have someone to keep you accountable on your fitness goals, too!
  • Yoga with Adriene - Have a friend who prefers a more low impact workout? Give the gift of a home yoga practice with stellar Austinite yogi, Adriene Mishler. She has hundreds of videos catered to every mood and body ailment you can imagine. Some of our farm folks swear by this gal and her healing routines. While you can find most of her videos online for free, if you join the YWA community there are perks like a library of exclusive members-only classes, and an online forum where you can connect with other yogis!
Hills for breakfast! #austinrunning #instarunners #roguerunning #TeamRogue #runcrew #runculture ? @beingcate

A photo posted by Rogue Running (@roguerunning) on



We hope this guide helps you navigate this holiday season with ease! 'Til next time!

SOUP'S ON! + GRINCH IN THE GREENHOUSE

12/16/16 — Heydon Hatcher

The holidays are upon us, and instead of getting stressed out as per usual, I’ve decided to focus my energy elsewhere: soup-making! You might not know this about me, but I LOVE to cook, a trait I’m sure I share with the majority of our CSA home-chef cooking all-stars. The taste of a fresh home-cooked meal is unrivaled, unparalleled, and supreme, it satiates the soul. Another little known Brenton-fact is that I have a voracious wintertime fervor for cooking soups and chilis. I love that the aromatic fragrances permeate and warm the whole house, plus it’s a serious comfort food to boot. Of all the many different types of cuisine that exist (I have quite an extensive cookbook collection, over 300 books!), my specialty resides in the Mexican and Cajun realm of cooking. Making a big ole vat of gumbo is something that I relish, and I find the process extremely meditative. Plus, living in Central Texas enables us, luckily, to grow most all of the veggies that are integral & popular in Cajun and Mexican recipes. YAHOO!

Chicken Tortilla Soup. Chicken Tortilla Soup.

On my recent jaunt to Monterrey, the extensive, varied, and brilliantly vibrant produce at the farmers markets really inspired me to experiment and utilize more Mexican produce in my cooking. As a small token of my appreciation for our assiduous and incredible crews, I decided to make a huge vat of tortilla soup. Our Garfield crew grubbed down earlier in the week, and our Hergotz crew will be fully fed next week. The holidays are a perfect time to take inventory on the many aspects of life to be thankful for - and I must say, I am one lucky guy.

Farmers market spread in Monterrey. Farmers market spread in Monterrey.

Farmers market spread in Monterrey. Farmers market spread in Monterrey.

Farmers market spread in Monterrey. Farmers market spread in Monterrey.

We already have a gargantuan stainless steel pot and heavy duty burner for making carnitas at the farm, so thankfully the soup-making venture was equipped! The pots came with the biggest utensils I have ever set my eyes on… I swear there’s a spoon that is bordering on 4 feet long. And, don’t get me started on the ladle, it holds SO MUCH liquid… but, I digress. I’ve made tortilla soup before, so I had a pretty good idea of where to start, but I wanted to do a little research first to make it as authentic as possible. The first recipe I read was written by Rick Bayles, one of my favorite cookbook authors. He studied Latin American anthropology + linguistics, and hosted a cooking show for a long time focused on Mexican food. His recipe for Sopa Azteca talks about the history of the dish, explaining that it originated in the Mexico City area before becoming popular across the American Southwest in the 1970’s.

Giant utensils! Giant utensils!

Rick’s recipe was great, but I wanted something a little more in-depth that used more authentic ingredients. My philosophy in cooking is to use raw and fresh ingredients as much as possible. I don’t want to buy a powdered chile blend, I want to buy whole chiles so I can grind and mix them myself. I follow the same philosophy in farming and in building. For example, all the soil we use in our greenhouse is mixed by hand to ensure we’re getting the exact composition we want. Is it easier to buy pre-made ingredients? Of course. But to me, getting it right is worth the extra effort.

With that philosophy in mind, I found this recipe which suggests roasting fresh whole tomatoes, corn cobs, heads of garlic, onions, and dried chiles to deepen the broth’s flavor. The author of this recipe explains that one of the of the defining ingredients in tortilla soup is the type of chile used when making the broth. Some recipes call for ancho, chipotle, or even Hatch chiles, but the most traditional chile to use is dried pasilla, which is almost black in color and has a dark, complex flavor.

Ingredients. Ingredients.

With all my ingredients at hand, I spent the rest of Sunday night working on the soup. I put the recipes away and freestyled it, which is my favorite way to cook. I browned 20 pounds of chicken legs with onions and garlic in a huge pot. I let that simmer for awhile before adding carrots, celery, oranges, jalapenos, whole black peppercorns, salt, thyme, and some wonderful smelling guajillo powder given to me by a farmer friend in Italy this past September. I started the stock at sunset and let it simmer until midnight. I put the stock pot in an ice bath to cool it down before finally going to bed. The next morning I skimmed off the fat and stored the stock until Wednesday.

On the day of the big lunch, I enlisted our irrigation manager, Temo, to help me cook the rest of the soup. We re-heated and strained the stock, then picked all the chicken meat off the leg bones. Then, we roasted a huge pot of tomatoes, onions, garlic, poblano peppers and fresh corn until charred, puréed it, then added it to the simmering stock. We reserved some of the roasted vegetable mixture to make fresh salsa. We also lightly roasted the pasilla chiles, rehydrated them in hot water, then puréed them and added them to the stock as well. Then we added more charred corn, chopped carrots, shredded chicken breast and fresh epazote. We called the whole crew over to the lunch barn and started serving everyone. The steam coming off the huge soup pot was surely a welcome sight on such a cold, blustery day. We put tons of fresh garnishes on all the tables to top off the soup: radishes, avocado, queso asadero, crema, jalapenos, epazote, scallions, cilantro, limes and freshly made tortilla chips. The soup was a huge success, and we’re going to do a repeat lunch for our packing crew at Hergotz next week. Now’s the perfect time to gather all your friends, family, and coworkers together to try out a huge pot of this soup for yourself. See the ingredients I used below if you’re inspired by the photos in this story.

Straining the stock. Straining the stock.

Fresh toppings. Fresh toppings.

Processed with VSCO with c1 preset

Enjoying the final product. Enjoying the final product.

Enjoying the final product. Enjoying the final product.

For the stock:
  • 20 pounds of chicken legs
  • 2 bunches of carrots
  • Celery
  • 6-8 Oranges
  • Jalapeños
  • Whole black peppercorns
  • Salt
  • Thyme
  • Roasted guajillo powder
  • Toasted and freshly ground cumin
  • Dried Mexican oregano
For the Soup:
  • 13 large dried pasilla chiles
  • 20 lbs of tomatoes fire-roasted
  • Peanut oil – I like this oil because it’s what I grew up with in Alabama. The town I was born in, Dothan, is the peanut capital of the world.
  • 10 or so large white onions, sliced 1/4-inch thick
  • Approx. 8 garlic heads
  • A few bunches of carrots
  • 1 bunch of epazote
  • 3 chickens
  • 12 ears of corn, shucked, kernels removed from cobs, milk scraped from empty cobs
  • 6 large poblano peppers
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 6 cans no-salt black beans, drained and rinsed
For the toppings:
  • 100 tortillas sliced into thin strips and fried in peanut oil
  • 1 quart Mexican crema
  • Epazote
  • 3 pounds shredded Mexican melting cheese asadero
  • 15 avocados, pitted, sliced and flesh scooped from the skin
  • Chopped scallions
  • Sliced fresh jalapenons
  • Sliced red radishes
  • fresh cilantro bunches
  • 15 limes, cut into 6 wedges
Feeds 100 hungry farmers!

Thanks again to everyone who came out to the Rolling Roadshow’s screening of The Grinch! Who could have imagined that nestling in with loved ones to enjoy our grumpy green friend’s escapades on the big screen would ever take place in our greenhouses? It was wonderful to say the least, and the Rolling Roadshow team is seriously a dream. We are grateful that Music, Tech, and Food and the Central Texas Food Bank ventured out and spread the good word on their mission and how they combat food insecurity in our fair city (Thank you! Thank you!). Face-painting, okra ornament decorating, food truck delights, an extensive and very unique photo-booth, a very impressive wrapping contest, and cozy hay-rides (endless thanks to Brandon, our greenhouse manager, and Charlotte, our assistant farm manager, for being such rockstar tour-guides!) were all a veritable success! The grinch even came! He’s one weird dude! He definitely spooked some folks, but hey, he is the star of the movie, so… we let him stick around. Our diligent volunteers made everything heaps easier and helped immensely with everything running smoothly. Thanks to Ada for all her hard work on the event, we couldn’t do it without her. I love when we can get our farm community together, especially this time of year. We are super grateful for y’all’s support. ‘Til next time!



 

img_8952 Photobooth shenanigans.

161213_sdg307736 Okra ornaments. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

image14 Snuggled up to enjoy the movie.

unnamed-6 Hayride!

Want to work on the farm with a show-stopping crew of your new best friends? Take a peek at some of our current openings!

Still looking for gifts for loved ones? Never fear, the JBG Gift Guide is here!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Hats! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Market bucks. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Market bucks. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

WEEK 50 IN PHOTOS

12/16/16 — Heydon Hatcher

161213_sdg307554by Charlotte McClure

It's hard to believe it's Week 50! We've already got New Year's resolutions on our minds! This week, we started ordering seeds for 2017... We're excited to try some new tomato and pepper varieties next year, along with some beautiful mini head lettuce. We are already planning out the Spring transplant sale, and have some really awesome stuff up our sleeve for that event. It's going to be a great Spring season! But for now, we're relishing what's left of 2016 and enjoying winter's radishes, fennel, carrots, and turnips.

A big thanks to everyone who made it out for the Rolling Roadshow's screening of The Grinch this past weekend, it was a blast!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

 

 

CURRIED FENNEL & CAULIFLOWER SOUP

12/20/16 — Heydon Hatcher

161213_sdg307649by Hector Gonzalez

Curried Fennel & Cauliflower Soup
  • 4 fennel stalks
  • 4 cauliflower leaves
  • 1 medium cauliflower head
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1 tsp of coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp of curry powder (use your favorite!)
  • 3 cups of vegetable broth (He used his corn cob broth in the video)
  • Salt and pepper to taste


Dice the fennel stalks and cauliflower leaves. Cut the cauliflower in florets, chop the stalks also Put pan to medium heat. Add the stalks and leaves and sauteé until soft (3-5 minutes).

Add garlic and toss for 1 minute. Add the curry powder and toss again for 2 minutes. Add cauliflower. Toss again.

Add the vegetable broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes or until florets are soft. Let it cool for 5 minutes.

Blend until all ingredients are well mixed. Add more broth if you want it more liquid Top with salt, pepper and leftover cauliflower leaves and fennel fronds

Enjoy while listening to Merle Haggard (Hector's recommendation)

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 19TH

12/20/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 19th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 19th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Red
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Fennel
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Pea Tendrils
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Watermelon
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Korean Purple
Turnip, Scarlett
Small Box
Bok Choy, Baby
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Fennel
Onion, Green
Radish, Watermelon
Individual Box
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Turnip, Scarlett

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 19TH

12/20/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 19th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 19th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Mustard
Herb, Parsley, Curly
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, Purple Top

GREEN PORK POSOLE

12/22/16 — Heydon Hatcher

img_4328by Megan Winfrey

One reason (of many) that I love living in Texas is all of the Mexican traditions and influences that filter across the border. Tamales were always a big part of the holidays growing up, and although I've yet to attempt making them myself, I love supporting the families that make them each year in the traditional way. I try to have a few dozen stowed away in the freezer by mid-December, making Christmas Eve dinner a total breeze. All I have to do is make the posole. Homemade tamales and posole is a traditional New Mexican holiday meal, and such a heart-warming way to celebrate and feast with family and friends. Here's to ya'll, everyone at JBG, holiday traditions, and a hopeful, healthy 2017!

Green Pork Posole

  • 2 cans white corn hominy
  • 2 tsp. olive oil
  • 8 oz. boneless pork loin, cubed
  • 1 cup onion, chopped
  • 2 tsp. dried oregano
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 3 cups water
  • 5 cups chicken stock
  • 2 dried New Mexican chiles
  • 2 cups cabbage, shredded
  • 1/3 cup green onions, chopped
  • lime wedges


Heat oil in a pan over medium high. Add the pork and cook for about 5 minutes, until brown on all sides. Add onion and cook another 2 minutes. Add oregano, salt, garlic, and bay leaf - cook for another minute. Add the hominy, water, and broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add chiles and simmer for another 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Discard the chiles and bay leaf and ladle soup into large bowls. Garnish with cabbage and green onions and finish it off with a squeeze of fresh lime juice. Enjoy with homemade pork tamales!

WEEK 51 IN PHOTOS

12/23/16 — Heydon Hatcher

161220_sdg308442

Week 51 caught us in a bit of a tizzy. With three nights of intense freeze, we found ourselves toiling tirelessly to get the harvest into the greenhouses to evade the damage that freeze can wreak upon the crops. Transporting the yield was quite the endeavor seeing as it’s the peak of our harvest season, and we have so much coming in currently! Our team banded together, gave it 110 percent, and got the work done though. Despite the damage that the cold caused, the silver lining of that struggle was seeing our team working cooperating, communicating, and working together. It was awesome!

We are wishing everyone of you the happiest holiday season. We cannot say enough how grateful we are of your support… it really makes our hearts sing!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

TO OUR BELOVED CUSTOMERS

12/23/16 — Heydon Hatcher

“A community is the mental and spiritual condition of knowing that the place is shared, and that the people who share the place define and limit the possibilities of each other’s lives. It is the knowledge that people have of each other, their concern for each other, their trust in each other, the freedom with which they come and go among themselves” - Wendell Berry
Veggie love! Veggie love!

To our beloved customers,

With the holiday season upon us, we are overwhelmed with feelings of gratitude. 2016 has been a whirlwind to say the least. At the farm, we started ‘16 with the best and most successful 5 months, while the end of year materialized as the hardest 7 months that we have had on record. With three nights of freezing weather this past week, it was truly frightening. Freeze can be immensely destructive, and as it the peak of our harvest season, there is a plethora of produce coming in from the fields. Thus, our entire farm team pitched in to transport the harvest as quickly as possible into the greenhouses. With the inherent obstacles that come with being a farmer (dang you, elements!), it oftentimes means heartbreak and staggering feelings of loss; however, in this particular instance, seeing our team banding together in a time of need, I saw a strong group of people giving 110 percent to save the day. A gaggle of muddy super heroes to the rescue! I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, the team that we have at the farm right now is the cream of the crop. We have never been so in tune with each other... There is no shortage of cooperation, communication, and hard work. We are all committed to making the farm awesome and stronger than ever. We have so many exciting projects and ideas up our sleeve, we foresee greatness in the New Year. For example, we have new Ark of Taste varieties that we will be offering at our upcoming Spring transplant sale, plus, new crops that will be appearing in your CSA shares that we have never dabbled in growing before! All of our schemes for 2017 have us marinating in immense anticipation… we cannot wait to share it with you!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We could not be doing what we love so passionately without the tremendous and perennial support from you, our community. Your support is changing our food system, one purchase at a time. It helps employ over 90 full-time Austinites with fair wages, and let’s these folks work in jobs they believe in, plus it ultimately helps make farm labor a viable and respected job. Austin, with it’s highly-saturated oasis of talented chefs, amazing farm-to-table restaurants, locavores, foodies, and general enthusiasm for organic farming, I couldn’t have found a better place to farm. I honestly believe that if I started this business in South Alabama, where I’m from, there just wouldn’t be the support for what we are doing. Just knowing that we are helping keep Austin fed and that you appreciate us, keeps us going day after day.

We love our relationships with you. We love knowing your dogs' names and your kids' kale preferences. We don't even mind your disdain when there’s a sustained influx of okra... we're right there with you! We love that we grow food, and then get to meet the families that eat it. We love hearing about your recipe triumphs and failures. Your involvement and feedback is what pushes us to work each day to improve the quality and taste of our vegetables.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Our entire JBG family is a complicated web of greenhouse workers, harvest crew, market staff, and the guys and gals that pack your CSA boxes... but you're also a very real part of the family. We do this for you, and we hope you not only know this, but taste it.

CSA members: You've stuck with us through thick and thin... though weeks of okra and devastating database crashes! Through flooded fields and destroyed greenhouses! I can't let this opportunity pass by without extending my very sincere and wholehearted appreciation your way. JBG wouldn't exist if it weren't for your commitment to buying locally and organically; I know it's not always easy or convenient.

The business of farming often gets in the way of remembering to say thank you... So thank YOU, and your family, and all the mouths you nourish with our vegetables. You're the best community any farm could ever hope for, and we sincerely love you all. HAPPY HOLIDAYS.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

If you're reading this, it's because you care about the farm, and you believe in what we're trying to do. This holiday, do us a favor and tell a friend about us! November and December are always hard months for us (as many of you all are traveling and buying less vegetables), so your help telling a friend about our CSA program or our market stand is very helpful and greatly appreciated!

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 26TH

12/29/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 26th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 26th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Red
Carrot, Orange
Cauliflower, Romanesco
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Dill
Herb, Fennel
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Black Spanish
Radish, Watermelon
Turnip, Scarlett
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Dill
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Watermelon
Turnip, Scarlett
Small Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Korean Purple
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Dandelion
Potato, Sweet

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF DEC 26TH

12/29/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 26th CSA Box Contents Week of Dec 26th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Green Meat
Turnip, Scarlett

2016 IN PHOTOS

12/30/16 — Heydon Hatcher

A very merry 2017 from the JBG farm family to yours! This week we revisit and celebrate 2016 in photographs, and prepare to start the cycle all over again in the New Year. We want to take a brief moment to shower our farm photographer, Scott David Gordon, with all the praise and accolade we have in us! Scott is an unbelievably invaluable asset to our farm - he's out in the fields week after week, rain or shine, to take dazzling photos so that we can share our daily farm-fresh experience with you, our community. Thank you, Scott!

January:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

February:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Visiting AISD. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

March:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant sale. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Gardening workshop trailer tour. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

April:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Spring 5k. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

May:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Greenhouse destruction. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rainy May. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

June:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

July:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Yoga at the farm. Photo by Charlotte McClure.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Rolling Roadshow screening of The Seer at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

August:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

September:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

October:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. A check-up of our farm bees. Photo by Charlotte McClure.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fall potluck shenanigans. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fall potluck shenanigans. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Halloween at Hergotz. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

November:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Chucha, our model farm dog. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

December:

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Gettin' colder! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Grinch in the Greenhouse. Photo by Charlotte McClure.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Holidays at the Hergotz office. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Thanks for an amazing year, we can't wait to see what 2017 will bring! Happy New Year!

 

2016: A YEAR IN REVIEW

12/30/16 — Heydon Hatcher

Sunrise at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sunrise at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The New Year approaches, how exciting! Whilst looking forward to 2017, we are taking a moment to revisit some moments from quite the eventful 2016. While some of the recollections from the past year have us cringing, others have us smiling ear-to-ear. So, cheers to a year well-lived, 2016, you sure have taught us a lot.

FARM TO SCHOOL! Early 2016, we visited a lot of cafeterias, and saw our farm-to-school program in real-life... on cafeteria trays.

Ada at Travis Heights Elementary. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Ada at Travis Heights Elementary. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

All of our events, including: Our Gardening Workshop was a veritable success and so much fun. There are more events like this to come in Spring of 2017! Community: what kind of workshops would you like to see?

In 2016, we hosted more farm tours than ever (gardening workshop tour, several CSA tours, chef tours, Slow Food tours, Grinch in the Greenhouse tour)! It’s so great to share our beautiful farmland with our community.

Fall Potluck farm tour. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fall Potluck farm tour. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The Rolling Roadshow screenings of The Seer (this summer) and The Grinch (this winter) have been such wonderful events. We really think that these are so unique, intimate, and special gatherings. Working with the Alamo Drafthouse has been a dream, they are truly an amazing team to collaborate with. We hope for more screenings in 2017!

Our Spring Potluck + Fun Run & Fall Potluck - We relish getting the community together, especially over dishes that everyone has taken the time to create and share. There is nothing like bonding over a home-cooked meal especially at the farm where the food is grown. It doesn’t get much better than that!

Fall Potluck. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fall Potluck. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

NEW CROPS: With a new year comes ample opportunity to dabble and experiment in new crop varieties! Radishes galore: Black Spanish, Chinese Green, Green Neck Daikon, Chinese Pink, Purple Daikon, Plum Purple, Red Top.

A smattering of radish varieties. Photo by Scott David Gordon. A smattering of our new radish varieties. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

New garlic varieties: German White, Spanish Roja.

Greens: Bok Choy, Red Kale, Tatsoi, Choi Sum, Hon Tsai, Komatsuna, and Braising Mix.

Asian greens spotted at market. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Asian greens spotted at market. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

This year we even harvested red and white table grapes for the first time. They sure were delicious! We can’t wait until the next harvest. We even had a miniscule but highly succulent harvest of Satsuma Mandarins, which were immensely delectable. On top of that, we harvested pomegranates, loquats, pears, and two kinds of persimmons as well as sugar cane! We sure did branch out!

Katie in the vines. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Katie in the vines. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Other Notable Events: In May of this year, storms wreaked havoc on our greenhouses. This was a major setback to our daily operations, but with the continual support of the community and the Drafthouse, we were able to reconstruct these structures.

In the words of Ada, our CSA Marketing and CSA Manager: “For me, a large part of what has defined the past year is our crew.  For example - it's now been over a year since we've had Daniel on the team. He is the rock and foundation of all things customer-service... he does an amazing job + truly cares about our members. CSA program would not run without him!” There are so many hard-working gems that keep the farm running daily.

Our superhero, Daniel. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Our superhero, Daniel. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

General changes in the (J)b(G)usiness that made our lives easier and the farm more efficient: new harvest trailers, a new mini-van, and last but not least, a CSA customization feature that is finally glitch-free!

Harvest trailers! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvest trailers! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

...And so much more! We are so grateful for the lessons that 2016 instilled in us, and of course, the growth of the community around our farm. We say it over and over again, but we wouldn’t be here without you. So, we thank you, and send you wishes of the happiest New Year yet!!

“Connection is health. And what our society does its best to disguise from us is how ordinary, how commonly attainable, health is. We lose our health -- and create profitable diseases and dependencies -- by failing to see the direct connections between living and eating, eating and working, working and loving.” -Wendell Berry


With the advent of a new year, there are plentiful chances to start anew, reassess, and establish new lifestyle routines. It’s a prime time to change your diet and get healthy! If you're thinking about joining our CSA community, keep your eyes peeled for a special limited time gift that we'll be throwing your way… VERY soon. It can’t be beat!

MY GIFT TO YOU

12/30/16 — Heydon Hatcher

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Hey guys, this is Brenton Johnson, farmer and owner at Johnson's Backyard Garden.

As an organic farmer, I feel lucky to be able to put vegetables on the table every week for many families in central Texas through our CSA farmshare boxes.

For me, cooking at home is a way to be creative and collaborate with my friends and family. But with so many amazing restaurants in Austin, even I find it difficult to commit to cooking at home every day... so I wanted to offer something special for those of you who like to tear up the kitchen from time to time.

I want to deliver a box of our fresh organic produce to your doorstep once a month. You wouldn't believe the flavors, colors, and variety of our fruits, vegetables, herbs and flowers throughout the year.

Just choose whether you'd like a six-month or twelve-month subscription. To sign up, call 512-386-5273 or email us at farm@jbgorganic.com with "One Box Special" in the subject line. Farmshare boxes are $38 per month (12 mo.- $456) and $40 per month (6 mo. -$240). We're not advertising this anywhere else, but please feel free to forward this to a friend.

Whether you've been in Austin for a few months or a few decades, I hope you experience the best of both culinary worlds this year. Here's to eating out and cooking at home in 2017.

Your farmer, Brenton
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