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CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 3RD

10/04/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 3rd CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 3rd

Large Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Dandelion
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Lemongrass
Melon, Watermelon, Red
Okra
Pepper, Italian Yellow
Pepper, Serrano
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Patty Pan
Turnip, White Japanese
Medium Box
Bok Choy
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Dandelion
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Spearmint
Melon, Watermelon, Red
Okra
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Zucchini
Small Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Collards
Greens, Dandelion
Melon, Watermelon, Red
Pepper, Serrano
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Greens, Sweet Potato
Melon, Watermelon, Red
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, White Japanese

2016 FALL POTLUCK BANNER

10/04/16 — Farm

csa-potluck-fall-2016

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 3RD

10/04/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 3rd CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 3rd

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Braising Mix
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Sweet Potato
Herb, Lemongrass
Okra
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Red
Squash, Butternut

WATERMELON RIND PICKLES

10/04/16 — Heydon Hatcher

melonsimg_3186by Megan Winfrey

If you've been following along for awhile, you know that I love to make pickles. I've pickled everything from cucumbers to okra, tomatoes, beets, green beans, peppers, and jicama. They haven't all been successes, but that's exactly what keeps me pickling - the determination to perfect my techniques. Thinking about all of the different types of pickles out there could make your head spin! Theres dill, bread and butter, garlic, spicy, sweet, candied, sour, half sour, and then there's an even longer list of produce to pickle! It's just so fascinating! I find that pickling and preserving makes me feel closer to the earth and closer to my ancestors, who couldn't rely on a refrigerator or even an unwavering source of produce. They preserved as a way of life, and if I could just get ahold of those recipes, my days of trial and error could end much quicker!

Watermelon Rind Pickles
  • 1 JBG watermelon
  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 cups white sugar
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 tsp. whole cloves
  • 1 lemon, thinly sliced
For the brine:
  • 1 quart water
  • 1/4 cup kosher salt
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First, using a serrated vegetable peeler or sharp knife, remove the outer skin of the watermelon. Slice the melon and remove the pink flesh, which you should definitely cube, cover with Tajin, and devour. You're left with the light green rind, which should then be cut into 1 inch slices.

Soak the rind overnight in the brine, made by dissolving 1/4 cup of kosher salt in each quart of water needed to cover the rind. If doubling this recipe, double the brine also.

Drain the brine away, then thoroughly rinse the rind in cool water. Drain completely.

At this point, if you haven't already, sterilize your jars. Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Add the jars you'll be using (glass part only) and allow to boil steadily while the rind cooks down. This recipe yields two pint jars of pickles.

Combine the rest of the ingredients in a large saucepan and allow to boil together for 5 minutes. Your kitchen will now smell amazing! Add the rind slowly in batches, then let simmer for about 30 minutes, until the rind appears translucent.

Pack the rind in hot, sterile jars and cover with the remaining liquid. Let cool at room temperature, then check to make sure the center of the lid is tightly sealed before refrigerating. These will stay in the fridge for several months.

Side note: I missed the part about skinning the watermelon, whoops! But I found that leaving the skin on gave the pickles a nice bite, and didn't affect the flavor at all. I think I'll always make them this way! Oh, and the lemon rinds are delicious, too.

WEEK 40 IN PHOTOS

10/07/16 — Heydon Hatcher

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Week 40 has us REALLY busy. The slight change in weather has been welcomed with open arms as we are finally seeing the light at the end of the tunnel… two weeks away from having all the fall planting done! After having the greenhouses brimful of transplants, these babies are on tractor after tractor, and we are getting them in the ground.

A huge thanks to the volunteers who have been helping us out at the farm! We need as many hands on deck as we can get! This time of year is always super exciting on the farm, as there are so many different things simultaneously happening. Seeding, plowing, cover crops from the summertime are getting mowed down, while cover crops for the fall are getting seeded, and on top of that, the greenhouses are getting their final touches. The carrots we planted early are almost ready for market, and kale is, too! Yahoo!

We're are getting psyched for our CSA Members Only Dinner on October 22! RSVP here. Also, Slow Food Austin will be doing a tour of the farm on October 23! Buy tickets here, and find more general event info here. Keep farmin', y'all!

 

Busy bees. Transplant work. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm dawg. Farm dawg, Chucha. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Flower power. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Flower power. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Kale texture. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Kale texture. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Montana workin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Montana workin'. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Montana doing a seed dance. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Montana doing a seed dance. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Fall-time goodness. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fall-time goodness... bunched beets! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Temo's model moment. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Temo's model moment. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ready to go in the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon Ready to go in the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Greenhouses getting their final touches. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Greenhouses getting their final touches. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ready for market. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Ready for market. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Fall scene. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fall scene. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Mustard greens. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Mustard greens. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

 

FIRST FRIDAY STAFF PICKS - OCTOBER EDITION

10/07/16 — Heydon Hatcher

October means another highly-anticipated, possibly spooky(?) installment of our First Friday Staff Picks! In the words of one of our wholesale managers, Travis: "October brings with it so many awesome things... where even to begin?"

We love sharing events, adventures, and side projects that inspire and excite us (food-related or not) with our community. Check out our JBG staff-curated list of favorites below!

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Montana: I'm excited about a new crop of carrots starting to size up. Fresh bunched beets being harvested also makes me happy! This weekend I enjoyed a relaxing trip to Utopia fest. Calliope Musicals, Rubblebucket, Milkdrive, and Whiskey Shivers all got my feet movin'!

Daniel: I went to Telluride for the Blues and Brews festival a few weeks ago - it was awesome. Also got a shoutout from some random guy when I wore my JBG hat. Delivered some hats to Shakey Graves, did some great hiking, heard some good bands, and drank some good beer.

Ada: My new 501 jeans that I just bought from local vintage shop, Loyal Vintage. Everyday, I thank my lucky stars that I live in an era when mom-jeans are in style (I think).

SOUP! Specifically, this Italian meatball soup which I made with venison and pork instead of beef. I also added in all the veggies I needed to use up in my fridge (zucchini, butternut, kale, peppers, sweet potatoes), and used some frozen tomato sauce from the summer. DELISHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH.

The Greenbelt!! It's never been better, AND makes me and my dog feel like the wild women that we are.

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A photo posted by Missoula Broussard (@chermissoula) on





Kenny: Going to Nashville weekend after next to see Bill Burr tape his new special! Margo Price @ Gruene Hall is next week too, and also lookin' forward to Morris Day & The Time @ ACL Zombie Ball! If you're bored in Austin you're doing something wrong. I'm stoked for the return of kohlrabi because it's like eating little alien Hell-raiser babies for breakfast. Stoked for fall weather, if it lasts.

Travis: Horror movies (especially B-grade). The more campy the better, if ya know what I mean. Troll 2, Plan 9 from Outer Space, Killer Klowns from Outer Space, House on Haunted Hill, Return of the Living Dead, The Toxic Avenger. All amazing in their own horrible ways.

Flannel shirts. It dropped down into the mid-80's last week and everyone I know started wearing flannel. I don't think there's a better signifier of cool weather than the flannel shirt.

Reverend Horton Heat. He's doing a six-night run at the Continental Club Oct. 25th-Oct. 30th, so you have six chances to get your dose of the psychobilly king.

Heydon: Iceland Airwaves. I interned with IA in 2014, and besides meeting some of the most interesting folks from all over this lovely planet, making fast friends, and falling deeply in love with Iceland's shockingly beautiful landscapes, a deep-seated respect and awe for Icelandic music was born within me. I swear, there is something in the geothermal waters that spawns this strange and awesome affinity in Icelandic people to make innovative, creative music. The queen being Bjork. Grab tickets to this year's event? It's not too late... plus sheepies and Northern Lights? Super cool.



#SHEEPS

A photo posted by heydon (@heydopotato) on


Also, Die Antwoord and Radiohead tonight at ACL! Knocking off a couple of bucket-list performances... aaand, Thom Yorke dancing forever and always.

Lena: I've been listening non-stop to Nothing's Real by Shura - it's fun, dance-y synth-pop with a touch of 80s nostalgia. My favorites are the title track, What's It Gonna Be? and Indecision.

I'm also really excited about The Beer Plant, a vegan gastropub that just opened. I'm looking forward to checking it out ASAP, starting with those delicious looking beer-battered hearts of palm!

FTFP: TERRA MADRE SALONE DEL GUSTO RECAP

10/07/16 — Heydon Hatcher

Bongiorno! If you’ve been reading the farm blog, you might know that I traveled to Italy (and abroad) for the first time ever last week. I was appointed as a delegate for Slow Food International’s biennial week-long event, Terra Madre Salone del Gusto. There are over 3000 delegates that represent over 150 different countries, so I was floored by my nomination. Prior to jumping on the plane, I was super excited, but had no idea what to expect. Besides growing produce from Slow Food’s Ark of Taste seeds to propagate to the community through transplant sales, I feel like I had a lot to learn about all that Slow Food International does.

Turin from the Mole Antonelliana Turin from the Mole Antonelliana

Turin street-scape. Turin street-scape.

The Po River runs through Turin. The Po River runs through Turin.

Right off the bat, I was amazed and inspired by the history and culture of Italy. All the different regions in Italy were so well-represented at the event. All the regional produce/products were so unique... preserved meats, cheese, all different kinds of rice, and WINES! Turin is located in the Piemonte region of Italy, an area notorious for their three “B”s of wine: Barolo, Barbaresco, and Barbera. Holy moly, are their wines delicious! Ever had Prosecco? It’s Italy’s version of Champagne… but, I digress…

My host on her way to work! My host on her way to work!

After I landed in Milan, I had a two hour drive to reach Turin. Man, did I feel ill... the bus-driver was whippin’ the bus around like it was a Ferrari! Despite being car-sick, I sat next to a brewer from Jalisco, and when we arrived in Turin, he treated me to an espresso. A bona fide Italian espresso! I was in hog heaven, because if you know me, I love coffee. After checking in, I met my host family and promptly caught some shut-eye. I had been awake for 30 hours at that point! They woke me up at around 8, and we enjoyed some dinner. My host family curated an amazing menu of meals throughout my stay; I was so grateful as they provided breakfast and dinner for me the entire week. Fresh bread and cheeses, marinated and roasted peppers, delicious wines, fresh salads, I could go on and on! The woman I stayed with was an attorney in Turin, her daughter was a drummer in a local band, and her other daughter had just moved to Mexico to be with her soon-to-be husband. I was fascinated to learn about this Italian family and their story.

The first dinner with my host family - roasted peppers, a refreshing salad, & fresh bread and cheese The first dinner with my host family - roasted peppers, a refreshing salad, & fresh bread and cheese.

The view from my window! The view from my window!

I quickly realized that I had hit the jackpot on my lodging location as it was located in central Turin! I could mosey over to the Slow Food meetings, I was so close.

The speeches took places in the coolest theatre I have ever been in! The speeches took places in the coolest theatre I have ever been in!

Tasting forum. Tasting workshop.

Alice Waters! Alice Waters!

Kicking off with a giant parade through town, all of the Slow Food events were mind-blowing. I attended tons of interesting speeches which took place in the most stunning theatre… This is where I met Alice Waters and the founder of Slow Food International, Carlo Petrini. Not only were there speakers of great culinary notoriety, but also talented filmmakers showcasing their films!

The kick-off parade! The kick-off parade!

There was a marketplace in Valentino Park right next to the Po River, where you could peruse and learn about artisans and their goods from all over the world. There were also the coolest-looking food trucks I had ever seen! On top of that, they hosted tasting workshops, where delegates could taste the craziest and most far-out produce, meats, artisanal goods… I tasted kangaroo and other aboriginal Australian foods! Delegates from certain regions would throw pop-up dinners as well. One of my favorites was when the Louisiana and Vietnam delegates paired up and hosted a delicious dinner featuring po-boys and traditional Vietnamese dried fruits. Yum!

A woman tying tiny tomatoes together. A woman tying tiny tomatoes together.

Onions. Onions.

All kinds of corn! All kinds of corn!

Preserved meats. Preserved meats.

Aged Balsamic. Aged Balsamic.

Other than that, I spent a lot of time walking around Turin, sight-seeing, visiting museums, and my favorite activity of all, checking out the daily farmer’s market. Despite the language barrier, I spent a lot of time chatting with the local farmers, showing them pictures of our farm, and vice versa. The produce that they offered was similar yet very different from what we cultivate here in Central Texas... I was mesmerized by the diversity.

Farmers Market. Farmers Market.

Farmers Market. Farmers Market.

Grapes galore. Grapes galore.

Plethora of fruits! Plethora of fruits!

Cheese, please. Cheese, please.

Meats! Meats!

Market scene. Market scene.

Italian food trucks. Italian food trucks.

I made a horde of new friends and learned loads about farming all over the world. One of my favorite moments was walking through the market, a cheese-maker recognized my JBG hat, ran over and said that he followed us on Instagram! Crazy!

Our Italian cheese-making Instagram friend! Our Italian cheese-making Instagram friend on the left!

I was remiss to leave when the time came, but sated with all the new experiences I had under my belt. I treated my host to a going away dinner on the final evening, and left on a high note of having the best pasta of my life! Arrivederci!

Pasta paradise. Pasta paradise.

Speaking of Slow Food events, don't miss out on Slow Food Austin's tour of the farm on October 23rd! Buy tickets here, and find more general information here. Also, we are having our CSA Members Only Potluck Dinner the night before! RSVP here, we can't wait!

FARMERS MARKET MANAGER (SUB)

10/10/16 — Farm

JBG is Hiring a Farmers' Market Manager

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Position Title: Farmers Market Manager (sub)

Location:  shift starts at Hergotz Lane barn         Department: Farmers Markets                                                

Reports To: On duty barn contact, usually Markets Packing Manager or Market reporting & Communication                                              Supervises: Market Staff

Position Summary:

JBG Organic is seeking a farmers’ market team leader to work at one of our farmer’s market stands in Austin and surrounding areas. To begin, this position will be a manager sub, filling in at various markets a few Saturdays (and possibly Sundays) per month. This position can become a regular weekly position.

 

The main task of the market manager is to drive the truck to market and oversee that the market runs smoothly. As a market manager, you are responsible for making sure the staff is doing their job, as well as being a versatile member of the team, whether it be running the cash register, providing customer service, or restocking vegetables and making sure the market booth looks the best that it can.

 

Responsibilities

 
  • Help unload and load market trucks including product, tents, weights, and tables at the beginning and end of each market
  • Report to Hergotz or Market location in a punctual manner
  • Drive market trucks in a safe and appropriate manner to market destinations, completing all tasks and procedures required to ensure proper use and maintenance
  • Act as a JBG ambassador, welcoming community members to learn about the farm, our produce, and upcoming farm events
  • Manage and supervise staff to maintain best market booth possible
  • Eagerness and Willingness to learn about JBG’s farming practices and product and relay to market staff and customers
  • Enforce and implement all rules and regulations for market functions and market staff as defined by market organizer and JBG
  • Enforce and implement all rules and money-handling procedures as outlined by JBG
  • Stay in tune with market happenings and ensure completion of market maintenance tasks such as market applications, booth fees, etc.
 

Qualifications Required
    • Strong sense of visual composition for market displays
    • Strong sense of customer service
    • Interest in local agriculture is a plus
    • Quick mental math skills
    • An outgoing and friendly attitude! Ability to create a positive team dynamic is key, utilizing both interpersonal skills and maintaining excellent organization.
 
  • Excellent judgment in prioritizing responsibilities and ability to multitask
 
    • Self directed worker, effective in both independent and collaborative settings
    • Flexible availability, with particular availability to work Saturdays and/or Sundays
 
  • Valid Texas drivers license, clean driving record
 
  • Ability to drive van or box truck
Preferred
  • Previous experience in a related field, and interest in local agriculture, cooking, and produce
  • forklift experience
 

Physical Requirements
  • Ability to repeatedly lift 50lbs
  • Ability to repeatedly kneel, bend, and squat
  • Ability to withstand exposure to varying weather conditions
  • Ability to withstand prolonged standing or walking
 

Schedule: part-time weekend sub; manager shifts start early (usually 5 or 6am Saturday morning)

 

Compensation & Benefits: Compensation is dependent on experience. Starting pay $10/hour. Paid bi-weekly. Plus a share of veggies per week.

 

Directions for Applying:

Please send an email to fawn@jbgorganic.com with the following format. Following specific directions is the first way to impress us!

 
  • Subject Line should read “JBG Market Manager Sub”
  • Email body should contain a letter of interest and brief explanation of relevant experience - help us notice you! Ensure that it contains your contact information and availability.
  • You may also attach a resume.
 

Thank you for your interest in JBG Organic! You will be contacted for further information if we find that you might be a good fit for this position. We will then set up a trial shift/working interview.

 

The responsibilities & duties listed above are intended to communicate general priorities of this position, but should not be understood as an exhaustive list of all work requirements to be completed at JBG Organic. Farms require flexibility! We are committed to training, developing, and promoting from within the company based on performance.

 

JBG Organic provides equal employment opportunities (EEO) to all employees and applicants for employment without regard to race, color, religion, gender, sex, national origin, age, disability, genetics, marital status, or sexual orientation.

EGG IN AN AVOCADO

10/11/16 — Heydon Hatcher

by Megan Winfrey

I stopped by the SFC farmer's market at the triangle last week and was pleasantly surprised to find a few baskets of late season tomatoes! Tomato season is always too short for me, so you better believe I scooped some up and have been relishing in their sweetness. This is a super simple breakfast to put together, but it packs mean nutrition and looks beautiful on the plate. No doubt this will become part of your regular rotation, if it isn't already.

Egg in an Avocado

  • 1 large avocado
  • 2 eggs
  • Salt and pepper
  • Juice of 1 lime
  • 1 tsp. cilantro or parsley, chopped
  • A handful of cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • Toast or tortillas, for serving


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Preheat the oven to 450ºF and move the rack to the center.

Cut the avocado in half and remove the pit. Using a spoon, make the well a bit larger by scraping out about a teaspoon of avocado. You want plenty of room for the egg to fit inside.

Squeeze lime juice over the avocado, sprinkle with salt, and place on a baking sheet. Break an egg into the center of each avocado. Some white may spill out and that is okay, as long as the yolk stays intact and in the center of the avocado. Bake until the white is set, about 10 minutes.

While baking, mix the tomatoes, cilantro or parsley, lime juice, and pepper in a small bowl and set aside. Toast a slice of bread or warm up a tortilla to soak up the runny yolk with. Plate everything once the eggs are done, and enjoy!

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 10TH

10/11/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 10th CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 10th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Cucumber, Slicing
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Lemongrass
Okra
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Tomato, Juliet
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Lemongrass
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Turnip, White Japanese
Small Box
Broccoli
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Mustard
Pepper, Italian Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Individual Box
Carrot, Orange
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Dandelion
Okra
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Zucchini

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 10TH

10/11/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 10th CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 10th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Greens, Dandelion
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Spearmint
Okra
Pepper, Serrano
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Red
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Zucchini

WEEK 41 IN PHOTOS

10/14/16 — Heydon Hatcher

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In week 41, we are nearing the end of fall planting, and the crops look amazing! Relishing in the cool early mornings, the changing of the seasons has us reeling in awe (and grateful!). We have quite a diverse fleet of radishes growing right now that will have your head spinnin' at market. Broccoli and cauliflower is on the way, too!

In other farm-event news, have you RSVP'd for our CSA Members Only Potluck Dinner on 10/22, or grabbed some tickets for Slow Food Austin's tour of the farm on 10/23? It's gonna be a jam-packed weekend... Come join the fun, we can't wait.

Transplant work. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant work. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplant teamwork. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant teamwork. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Gettin' ready. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tractor talk. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brenton and Roxy surveying. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton and Roxy surveying. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplant teamwork. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant teamwork. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Growing. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Yummy fall greens. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Yummy fall greens. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Harvesting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Sweet 'taters. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sweet 'taters. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Coming soon! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Coming soon! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

I spy broccoli! Photo by Scott David Gordon. I spy broccoli! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Dreamy curly kale. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Dreamy curly kale. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

You're super rad-ish! Photo by Scott David Gordon. You're super rad-ish! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Stunning farm colors. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Stunning farm colors. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The prettiest salad you ever did see. Photo by Scott David Gordon. The prettiest salad you ever did see. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

THE PROOF IS IN THE POTLUCK: JBG'S AMAZING CSA COMMUNITY & THE MEALS THAT UNITE US

10/14/16 — Heydon Hatcher

“Because you are my countrymen and so forth; and a good fellow, is a good fellow, though he have never a penny in his purse. We had but even pot-luck, a little to moisten our lips, and no more.” - Thomas Nashe, Summer’s Last Will and Testament

With the Fall CSA Member Only Potluck right around the corner (RSVP here!), we thought we would delve into a little history of potlucks in general AND pertaining to JBG!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The term “potluck” originates from taking the “luck of the pot”... Instead of discarding leftovers, people would save their excess food, heated in a pot, with the unexpected visitor in mind (especially at inns and taverns in medieval times). A kind of “luck of the draw” and impromptu meal for a wayward traveler who happened upon an inn or someone’s home needing food and/or lodging for the evening. Fun fact: the above quote from prevalent 16th century writer, Thomas Nashe, is said to be one of the first times that the term “potluck” was used in a published piece! Moving on to more modern(ish) times, in the mid-19th to the beginning of the 20th century, the meaning shifted to a communal dinner where guests prepare and bring a dish to share. These are the potlucks we know and love. Our CSA is made up of some of Austin’s best home-chefs… and while we’re busy every week cooking for our families, the JBG Potluck is a wonderful time to share your favorite dishes with your CSA community, farmers, and friends. We know you have a favorite potluck dish… let’s see it (but more importantly, eat it)!

Potluck deliciousness. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck deliciousness. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

At JBG, we have been doing community potlucks since 2006! A bi-annual event that we always look forward to… a chance for the community to get together, enjoy the farm, and relish in the fall and spring weather. When we moved out to the 20 acres at Hergotz, Beth Johnson cooked up a bunch of chocolate chip cookies, brewed some strong coffee, and invited all of our CSA customers out to the farm. Thirty folks joined us as we walked through the fields and talked about our vision for the farm. We loved having everyone out to meet and interact; thus, the following fall, we had our first official potluck. We set up tents in the orchard, invited a couple of bands, and had a heck of a time. In 2008, we added a bunch of fun events, like ‘jump-the-creek’ and most notably, chase the farmer because who doesn’t want to chase Brenton, clad in a luchador mask and outfit, around the farm?

21-1 Chase the farmer!

Old flyer! Old potluck flyer!

Another old flyer. Another old flyer!

In spring of 2015, we decided to move the potlucks out to the Garfield farm. This way, everyone could breathe the fresh and funky farm air and enjoy this newly (at the time) acquired veggie oasis. We added a 5k to the event and partnered with the best in the runnin’ biz, Rogue Running, as a kind of self-guided tour around our 200 acre property on River Road (we are only doing these in the spring now… start training!). We built an awesome stage, especially for these events, to house some bona fide boot-stompin’ tunes from people like: Elizabeth McQueen, Doug Moreland, La Tampiquena, Chansons et Soulards, among many others.

We are over the moon that this year we'll be having a CSA Member potluck, and going back to the event's humble roots. We love the idea of people enjoying food with their community... after all, we’re all a part of the same C[ommunity]SA! The act of sharing food with another person has an overwhelmingly powerful ability to connect people. Doing this same act on the farm that grows your food... you're not only connected to your community, but also to the land, seasons, your farmers... WHOA! If that's not a special event, we don't know what is.

Boot-stompin' good time. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Boot-stompin' good time. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Family fun time. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sand pile = good times. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Family fun time. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Family fun time. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The farm should be a place for the whole family, and we want you to make the CSA a part of your family life... hence, bring the kiddos! There's tons of fields for them to explore and a sand pile to conquer. Tractor photo shoot? We've got you covered. Plus, a true fall is so fleeting in Texas... make sure you're enjoying it and getting OUTSIDE. Did we mention that our farm is a lovely place to be this time of year?

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Family portrait in the fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Family portrait in the fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Sand pile poses. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sand pile poses. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The DL on this year's potluck
  • Saturday, 10/22
  • GARFIELD farm (4008 River Road)
  • 4:30-dark. We'll try to eat at around 5:30
  • Yes to kids, yes to byob, yes to chairs + blankets (we'll have some tables set up, too).
  • Adelbert's, Hops & Grain, and Jester King have donated some brew for the occasion. (YUM!)
  • No dogs (Sorry, farmer’s orders! We love our doggies, too!)
  • BYOD[ISH] TO SHARE! That's what a potluck is, after all. Please label your dish noting any potential food allergens
  • Trying our best to make this a zero-waste event. Bring a dish + cutlery to enjoy your grub.
  • Our good friend, Josh Larue, from Breakaway Records will be there spinning some amazing tunes, and showing off his one-of-a-kind vinyl collection.
Our stage lit up at night. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Our stage lit up at night. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Excited to join the event, but don’t know what to make? Grab a recipe idea from Ada and Mike Mo below.

Ada, the recipe extraordinare! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Ada, the recipe extraordinare! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ada: Cabbage. So wonderful in all of its forms: raw in a salad or slaw, coarsely chopped and roasted with a generous squeeze of lemon, slowly braised, stuffed... perhaps one of the most versatile crops we grow.

We love this gratin recipe; sub sweet potatoes for regular potatoes, and you've got a hyper-seasonal potluck dish... perfect for sharing.

Coleslaw doesn't have to be the soupy mayonnaise-y mess that you might think of. Check out this Asian version that uses a miso-dressing. Throw in some in-season carrots, carrot tops, and radishes for a colorful fall salad. Short on time? A shredded cabbage salad doused in Wheatsville's cashew tamari dressing is just as good.

Instant seasonal dish, sure to please a crowd? Roasted veggies. Check out some techniques below. General techniques. Honey-roasted carrots. Coconut-oil roasted sweet potatoes.

Confused about that to do with turnips? Roast, mix with goat cheese and some herbs, and voila! *can sub beets in this recipe, too!

Looking for a way to use your CSA parsnips, kohlrabi, herbs, and turnips in one hearty recipe? Did someone say bacon vinaigrette?

Black spanish radishes. Great info on this sometimes puzzling crop here (been used for medicinal purposes for centuries!). Three great ways to use your radishes (this would work with black spanish, or any other!).

Mike Mo: I am a big fan of radishes with butter and salt. It's a French thing. Sauteed with butter and salt as a side (I think it may be a breakfast dish as well).

Our blog is always a great place to obtain seasonal recipes as well!

Our recipe blogger, Megan, and her daughter, Louisiana! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Our recipe blogger, Megan, and her daughter, Louisiana! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Ever go to the farmers market, fraternize with the JBG market staff, and think... 'Man! I want to be like them. They are so knowledgeable about veggies, hard-working, AND awesome!' Well, fret no longer, folks! Now's the time to join our team! We have farmers market openings - check out the job listing here

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 17TH

10/17/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 17th CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 17th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Cucumber, Slicing
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Lemongrass
Okra
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Tomato, Juliet
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Lemongrass
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Turnip, White Japanese
Small Box
Broccoli
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Mustard
Pepper, Italian Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Yellow
Individual Box
Carrot, Orange
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Dandelion
Okra
Squash, Butternut
Squash, Zucchini

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 17TH

10/18/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 17th CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 17th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Lemongrass
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Turnip, White Japanese

ITALIAN MEATBALL SOUP

10/19/16 — Heydon Hatcher

img_3382by Megan Winfrey

Even if it is still in the 90s here, it's fall damnit, and I'm making soup. I prefer hearty stews over pureed soups (Chicken n' Dumplings are my FAVE), and I'm always looking for new ways to spice up a broth or incorporate unusual ingredients into my soup dishes. After checking out the Italian Meatball Soup recipe that CSA manager Ada recommended in this month's First Friday Staff Picks, I knew I wanted to make it for y'all (and myself, duh). The broth is simple but has an awesome depth of flavor, and the meatballs are bright and tender. The only thing I changed about the original recipe was adding 2 cups of roasted butternut squash at the end. Like Ada said, you can add almost any vegetable, which is a great way to empty the fridge. I also got a pro-tip from my real Italian friend's real Italian grandmother - lightly roll your meatballs, don't overwork them. And like all soups, this one is even better the next day.

THE BUZZ ABOUT OUR BEES

10/21/16 — Heydon Hatcher

It’s hive time for a bee update, don’t you think? We briefly mentioned these hard-working winged ones and the folks who care for them on the blog back in July, but if you haven’t been following along… here’s an abridged history.

Photo by Charlotte McClure. Photo by Charlotte McClure.

St. David’s Environmental Guild received a grant to place a couple beehives on their property earlier in the year; however, with zoning restrictions downtown, they needed to outsource their honeybees. Because of our CSA drop there and our inherent and constant need for large-scale pollination (200 acres warrants a whole lot of pollinating), they immediately thought of us as a fit host for their bees! We had one pre-existing hive, but were ecstatic at the prospect of having more as the benefits of having hives on the farm are numerous (boosts in vegetable yields, amelioration of overall produce quality, delectable and succulent honey, and helping preserve a quickly dwindling worldwide bee population to name a few). Thus bee-gan the grand honeybee adventure at JB[ee]G!

Photo by Charlotte McClure. Photo by Charlotte McClure.

The hives are located in a grove of trees neighboring the Colorado River, so they have plenty of access to shade, water, and prolific organic fields to forage. Currently, our three hives are very healthy (albeit really aggressive), and set to produce loads of honey next year if the rain and nectar flow are sufficient and steady, according to the beekeepers. The bees are preparing for the more dormant winter months, sealing up honeycomb, and gathering around the queen to keep her warm on the cooler days ahead.

Photo by Charlotte McClure. Photo by Charlotte McClure.

This week, the lead beekeeper, Jason Minnix, spearheaded an attempt to re-queen the colonies to ameliorate the rampant erratic and volatile bee-havior of two of the hives as the queen dictates the temperament of the rest of the bee population. He came by earlier this week with the new queens (fun fact: they arrive via mail in tiny wooden cages!), suited up and ready to start the meticulous task of finding and replacing the current reigning queens. Very important side note: if you don't remove a colony's old queen before introducing the new one, the hive may reject the new queen and kill her. On the first hive, Jason couldn’t find the queen after searching for an hour, but went ahead and put in the new queen. As said by Charlotte, our farm administrator, “looking for the queen bee among thousands of workers and drones [is] like a constantly moving Where's Waldo puzzle.” So in this situation, there is a 50/50 chance of them accepting or killing her… fingers crossed they keep her! On the second hive, the search was exponentially quicker… he placed the new queen in the colony after removing the old one successfully. All signs point to the bees accepting her! Let’s hope these new queens maintain a more peaceful vibe within the colonies.

 


We are over the moon to be working with St. David’s, and immensely grateful for all their marvellous and brave volunteers who care for the bees. Y’all bee-have until next time!

Don’t miss our CSA Members Only Potluck this Saturday, 10/22 at the farm! RSVP here. If you can’t make it Saturday, no problem! Slow Food Austin is hosting a farm tour on Sunday, 10/23, buy tickets here.

Was this our okra? We may never know, but speculating sure is fun. Regardless, our okra really is the bomb. Speaking of okra: the days are dwindling to get our favorite okra dish at Contigo!

WEEK 42 IN PHOTOS

10/21/16 — Heydon Hatcher

Brenton's happy place. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton's happy place. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We are in such a magical time of year. The brief but ever so lovely overlap of end of summer and beginning of fall crops has our markets bursting with vibrant and diverse produce. Come see us at your local market, you won't regret it!

The greenhouses are finally finished. Thanks again to the Alamo Drafthouse (more on that here) for pulling us up by our bootstraps when we were in serious dire straits. We're about to put in our winter cover crops of oats, fava beans, and biomaster peas, plus, garlic is going into the ground! We have some really amazing teamwork happening at the farm right now, with everyone giving 110% to get fall planting done (we can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel!).

At Hergotz, Ada and her volunteers finished up painting the box trucks, so keep an eye out for a shiny new JBG rooster rollin’ around town. Also, in case you haven’t heard, we've got several new CSA pickup sites that are noteworthy: Picnik on Fridays, Live Oak Brewery on Sundays, in.gredients on Tuesdays. All great options for a multi-purpose trip for beer, butter coffee, groceries veggies. Wish there was a CSA pickup at your favorite coffee shop or yoga studio? Wish your office had a farm-to-work program? E-mail us! (farm@jbgorganic.com).

Tracy and Ciara. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tracy and Ciara. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Market medley. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Market medley. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Leslie workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Leslie workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Market crew. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Market crew. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Early morning fog. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Early morning fog. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Curly kale harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Curly kale harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Collard harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Collard harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Many shades of green. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Many shades of green. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

One happy Brenton. Photo by Scott David Gordon. One happy Brenton. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Garlichat. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Garlichat. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Salad, anyone? Photo by Scott David Gordon. Salad, anyone? Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Dino kale harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Dino kale harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Serious farm meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Serious farm meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Transplant crew. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Transplant crew. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Fields of green. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fields of green. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

The greenhouses are finished! Photo by Scott David Gordon. The greenhouses are finished! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brandon is back! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brandon is back! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

OKRA, BACON & AVOCADO PASTA SALAD

10/25/16 — Heydon Hatcher

img_3388by Megan Winfrey

Raise your hand if you're trying to get better at meal prepping. Me too, me too. I see all of these responsible, healthy people out there who have their crap together - and a perfect stack of pre-prepped lunches in their fridge. I am, by no means, one of those people, but when I do make the time to prep meals for the week, I sure feel like it. And when I don't, I always find myself scrambling to make my husband a decent sandwich in the 2 minutes before he should be walking out the door (which really means he's already 5 minutes late) and then realizing that I'm having chips and hummus for lunch (again). The truth is, we are all SO much happier and healthier when there is something substantial in the fridge ready-to-eat, and pasta salad is my simple solution.

Okra, Bacon, & Avocado Pasta Salad
  • 12 oz. fusilli pasta
  • 1 lb. okra, stems removed and rough chopped
  • 4 slices of bacon, diced
  • 2 avocados, halved, seeded, peeled, and diced
  • salt and pepper, to taste
for the dressing:
  • 3/4 cup mayo
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 1/2 tbs. fresh lemon zest
  • 1 tbs. sugar
  • 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves
  • salt and pepper, to taste
  • 1/3 cup olive oil
 

Preheat oven to 450ºF.

Put the prepared okra on a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Bake until tender, about 15-20 minutes.

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and cook the pasta per the package directions or until al dente.

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and cook the bacon until brown and crispy, about 6-8 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel-lined plate to drain.

To make the dressing, first add the mayo, lemon juice, lemon zest, sugar, thyme, salt and pepper to a medium sized bowl. Slowly pour in the olive oil with one hand as you whisk the mixture with the other to combine. Set dressing aside.

In a large bowl, combine the pasta, okra, bacon, avocado, and dressing. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary.

Serve immediately, or store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to 1 week.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 24TH

10/25/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 24th CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 24th

Large Box
Bean, Green
Broccoli
Carrot, Rainbow
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Cilantro
Okra
Pepper, Poblano
Pepper, Sweet Medley
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Red
Turnip, Scarlett
Medium Box
Bean, Green
Broccoli
Carrot, Rainbow
Greens, Arugula
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Herb, Dill
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Turnip, White Japanese
Small Box
Carrot, Rainbow
Eggplant , Black
Greens, Dandelion
Greens, Kale, Dino
Herb, Cilantro
Potato, Sweet
Squash, Butternut
Turnip, Scarlett
Individual Box
Broccoli
Carrot, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Salad Mix
Okra
Squash, Butternut

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF OCT 24TH

10/25/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 24th CSA Box Contents Week of Oct 24th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Carrot, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Mustard
Herb, Cilantro
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Red
Squash, Butternut

WEEK 43 IN PHOTOS

10/28/16 — Heydon Hatcher

161022_sdg300476

It's garlic, leeks, and onion week! We're planting four varieties of garlic (elephant, mexican red, spanish roja, and german white) as well as pea tendrils, spinach, carrots, specialty lettuce, and parsnips. The farm looks beautiful right now, especially "cabbage hill" as you're driving in on the main road. Citrus is right around the corner, too! We should be offering oranges and grapefruits by the middle of November, so get psyched for the influx of vitamin C! Our CSA boxes are the most beautiful they have been all year... a spectrum of colors thanks to the huge variety of vegetables we are harvesting right now. Thanks again to everyone who attended and contributed to the CSA Member Potluck and Slow Food Farm Tour, we had such a great time! Also, Brenton participated in a roundtable with the US Secretary of Agriculture about energy efficiency this week! How cool is that?

Thanksgiving is right around the corner! If you are stressing about figuring out where to buy your meats and veggies this year, look no further! Dai Due is offering a delicious and all-encompassing menu of heirloom meats as well as a JBG veggie bundle to pair! Check it out here

If you are a CSA member that’s headed out of town, you can always donate your share instead of postponing it! Find more information about sponsored shares here.

**farm update contributions by Ada Broussard and Charlotte McClure

Potluck. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Potluck deliciousness. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck deliciousness. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

YUM. Photo by Scott David Gordon. YUM. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tiger spotting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tiger spotting (or should we say striping). Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Potluck dishes! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck dishes! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Eastside Pies. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Eastside Pies. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Sunny centerpieces. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Sunny centerpieces. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm exploration. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm exploration. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Tour guide Brenton. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Tour guide Brenton. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm exploration. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm exploration. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Farm exploration. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Farm exploration. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

CSA community. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Putting the C in CSA. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brenton's shadow, Roxy. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton's shadow, Roxy. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Nighttime. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Nighttime. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brenton at USDA meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton at USDA meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brenton at USDA meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton at USDA meeting. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Whole lotta habanero. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Whole lotta habanero. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Whole lotta jalapeno. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Whole lotta jalapeno. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Misty morning. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Misty morning. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Greenhouses in action. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Greenhouses in action. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Misty kale. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Misty kale. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Up close kale. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Up close kale. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Broccoli! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Broccoli! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Bok choy. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Bok choy. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Rainbow. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Taste the rainbow. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Workin' hard. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Fennel. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Fennel. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Dill. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Dill. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

GET YOU SOME GYPSUM!

10/28/16 — Heydon Hatcher

Gypsum? What’s that? Why do we use it?

Seems like farming would be a piece of cake, right? Just plant some seeds in the ground, twiddle our fingers, and wait for the veggies to emerge? Well, there’s a LOT more to it, and believe it or not, it includes chemistry, too! Our use of soil amendments generated lots of interest at the CSA Potluck and Slow Food Austin Farm Tour this past weekend, spurred by the piles of colorless mineral located intermittently around the farm. So slide on your science goggles, folks, and get ready to learn a quick thing or two about this mysterious mineral, gypsum! Steve Diver, an agri-horticultural consultant superstar who has been working alongside us since we made the leap from the Hergotz farm to the 200 acres in Garfield, took some time to chat with us this week and divulge his breadth of horticultural knowledge on the subject.

Gypsum! Photo by Scott David Gordon. Gypsum! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Soils in central Texas are derived from limestone geology, which means they are calcareous (or high in calcium), and are highly alkaline with a pH over 7.5. Therefore, you normally wouldn't add extra calcium, such as agricultural limestone, to these soils. However, a confounding factor is that the irrigation water we use contains a lot of sodium and bicarbonate which upsets the balance of exchangeable cations like calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sodium. This affects nutrient availability to our vegetable crops. Thus, gypsum, or calcium sulfate, is the perfect soil amendment to address this particular issue. It adds calcium to offset sodium without increasing the soil pH. That's why we take soil tests and add a suite of compost, organic fertilizers, and minerals to our fields every year -- to make sure our crops are well fed and taste good. ***

Gypsum. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Gypsum. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Interesting, eh? On top of the aforementioned facts, gypsum is known to improve water filtration, augment soil structure, reduce nutrient runoff, aid in reducing erosion, and improves plant nutrition overall so you can enjoy the most tasty and nutrient-dense vegetables! Whoda thunk? Farming and chemistry go hand in hand sometimes, are you surprised?

Gypsum at work. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Gypsum at work. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

A big thanks to everyone who joined the fun at the CSA Members Potluck and Slow Food Austin Farm Tour this past weekend, especially to our CSA members and Slow Food Austin. Not to mention the delightful fermented beverages from the powerhouse trio of local brew-masters, Jester King, Hops and Grain, and Adelbert’s on Saturday night, and the mouth-watering culinary curation from Snooze Eatery on Sunday morning. We are grateful for everyone’s time and contributions. We had a blast and hope you did, too. Find more photos from the event here!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck night! Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck deliciousness. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck noms. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck farm tour. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Potluck fun. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Potluck peeps. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

“I just wanted to take a second and thank you sincerely for such a wonderful night. We had a great time on Saturday. My only regret is not having joined the CSA months sooner. Every Tuesday afternoon, Sammy and I sit together on the porch waiting for our delivery. I loved being able to show him where our veggies come from. Brent, you've creating something beautiful and powerful and I'm grateful to share in that and teach my kids about it.” -CSA Member 

Get spooky with us and join the fun at the HOPE Night market this Friday! It’s from 6-10 pm at Plaza Saltillo. Find more info here.

Are you an Austin Energy client? If so, you are eligible to receive a free tree at the Sunset Valley Farmers Market this Saturday! Bring your ID, grab a tree, and visit Matt Pelkey at our stand for some veggie goodness! Check out the event here.

***major contributions by Steve Diver

A VERY SPOOKY HALLOWEEN FROM ALL OF US AT JBG!

10/31/16 — Heydon Hatcher

We had ourselves quite the Halloween costume contest this past Friday at the barn. Everyone was in good spirits, tossin' veggies around in their All Hallows' Eve best. Andrew was awarded first place and gift certificates from Contigo & Wheatsville with his awesome and very realistic rendition of the latest Nobel Prize winner, Bob Dylan. Sarah took second (and a gift certificate from Wheatsville, too!) with her brilliant and brightly clad Frida Kahlo, and Travis was presented with a very close third with his riveting Rosie the Riveter. Check out the rest of the costumes below. Have a spooky Halloween, y'all!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Brenton? Photo by Scott David Gordon. Brenton? Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.
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