Dismiss
LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 1ST

02/02/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 1st CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 1st

Large Box
Beet, Red
Bok Choy
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, White Japanese
Medium Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Small Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Arugula
Greens, Collards
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Herb, Fennel

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 1ST

02/02/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 1st CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 1st

Medium Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet

GOLDEN BEET & BRUSSELS SPROUTS FETTUCCINI

02/03/16 — Farm

IMG_3584

by Megan Winfrey

How about them brussels sprouts?! That majestic bouquet on my doorstep made me feel like I'd won something - and I may or may not have held it in the crook of my arm and practiced my best "figure 8 wave." Needless to say, I used them immediately for this recipe, which I think is a perfect one to welcome the coming Spring. Bright, yet still deep and rich in flavor. Light, but still pasta. This one goes out to mister groundhog - thanks for the good report, buddy.

Golden Beet & Brussels Sprouts Fettuccini
  • 3 golden beets
  • 1 stem of brussels sprouts
  • 1 lb. fettuccini noodles
  • 1/2 red onion, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 tbs. olive oil
  • 1/2 tsp. thyme
  • 1/4 tsp. red pepper flakes
  • 1/4 c. dry white wine
  • 4 tbs. goat cheese
  • salt & pepper
IMG_3583

I'm going to start with a little note on the prep work. I've found that with golden beets, unlike with red beets, you can easily peel them like potatoes! You can of course peel red beets, too, but suffer the blood bath. Golden beets don't stain or even transfer color, so I find it much easier to peel, chop, then bake rather than cook, cool, then peel and chop.

I'd never taken brussels sprouts off the vine before, but they popped off rather easily. The little ones at the top held on tighter, but I managed to pinch every last one off because to waste a sprout would be a crime. I then cut each one in half (but left the tiny ones whole), discarded the outer leaves, and rinsed thoroughly.

OKAY, let's cook.

Preheat oven to 400ºF.

Spread the chopped beets onto a baking sheet, drizzle with olive oil, salt, and pepper, and bake 25-30 minutes until tender. While the beets bake, sauté the red onion and garlic in olive oil for 2-3 minutes. Add the brussels sprouts, thyme, red pepper flakes, and a dash of salt. Sauté for 5 minutes. Pour in the white wine to deglaze the pan and continue cooking at a low simmer for 10-15 minutes, until the brussels sprouts are tender. Add the beets and additional salt and red pepper if desired. Prepare the pasta to al dente. Toss everything together with a drizzle of olive oil and top with crumbled goat cheese. Serve immediately, or refrigerate and enjoy as a chilled pasta salad - or both!

WEEK 5 IN PHOTOS

02/05/16 — Farm

Golden beet harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon Golden beet harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon

This week was beautiful at JBG. Clear frosty mornings gave way to highs in the 70s - all of our organic vegetables are loving this weather! We've got a great harvest headed to markets this weekend, and the weather is going to continue to be beautiful, so make sure you stop by and visit us!

We're harvesting some spring onions for markets this week. Photo by Scott David Gordon We're harvesting some spring onions for markets this week. Photo by Scott David Gordon

A small mountain of spring onions. Photo by Scott David Gordon A small mountain of spring onions. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Frosty mornings at the farm this week. Photo by Scott David Gordon Frosty mornings at the farm this week. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Salad mix getting a nice deep watering. Photo by Scott David Gordon Salad mix getting a nice deep watering. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Did you hear? We're hiring for our transplanting crew! Details on the jobs page. Photo by Scott David Gordon Did you hear? We're hiring for our transplanting crew! Details on the jobs page. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Spring is coming. Photo by Scott David Gordon Spring is coming. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Newly transplanted brassicas. Photo by Scott David Gordon Newly transplanted brassicas. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Up close with the collards. Photo by Scott David Gordon Up close with the collards. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Our new volunteer coordinator - welcome! Photo by Scott David Gordon New volunteer coordinator at our Hergotz farm - welcome Rachel! Photo by Scott David Gordon

Fennel transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon Fennel transplants. Photo by Scott David Gordon

NOW HIRING: PLANTING CREW

02/05/16 — Farm

150119_SDG220270

JBG is currently hiring transplanting crew as we approach one of our busiest planting seasons of the year. Farm experience is helpful, but we will train. This job is perfect for individuals interested in beginning a career in organic agriculture. Read the full job description and apply here.

START PREPPING YOUR BACKYARD GARDEN!

02/05/16 — Farm

150226_SDG221929

With Punxsutawney Phil predicting an early spring this year (independently verified by Canada's Shubenacadie Sam), it's time to start getting that backyard, side yard, or community garden plot ready for a bountiful spring and summer. If you're like us at JBG, your hands are itching with the urge to get out and fill that garden with new plants. But before you start planting, we've got a few tips to ensure your 2016 garden is productive and healthy!

Be sure to check out the details for our Annual Transplant Sale, as well as a special gardening workshop with Brenton, at the bottom of the page!



Check your Tools

It happens to the best of us - tools lying around, rain barrels getting a little slimy, trellises falling apart. Now is the best time to get everything clean and ready for you to hit the ground running when your pick up your organic transplants! Organize that shed, clean your tools, fix any broken fences or irrigation, and get ready for a great year!

130223_SDG148253

Clear your Garden

Whether you put in a winter cover crop, or you have leftover fall crop residues, or even if your garden has filled up with grass (hey, we'll count that one as a cover crop too), it's time to clear that bed and get ready for new plants. We recommend cutting whatever is left in your garden down to ground level. You can compost the residues or dig them right into your garden to decompose.

Aerate your Soil

Next, you'll want to start getting your soil ready for the growing hungry plants you're about to put in there. First things first, it's time to loosen the soil. Over time, water, gravity, and sedimentation slowly compact your garden soil. Compacted soil is not as productive - your plants need lots of oxygen around their roots and plenty of space for water to trickle down. You can use a digging fork to loosen the soil, or use the double digging technique. If you have rocky or poorly aerated soil, consider building yourself a raised-bed garden to give those plants the fluffy soils they need to thrive.

Ok, maybe not this much compost. Ok, maybe not this much compost.

Compost compost compost!

Your next step is to make sure your soils are healthy and fed! We recommend applying a few inches of compost to your garden every year. This provides your garden space with nutrient rich organic matter and a host of microorganisms. Not only is compost a fantastic, natural, slow-release fertilizer, but it will increase the water-holding capacity of your soil, and decrease erosion.

You can go a step further and get your soil tested - this will tell you if you need to add any micronutrients or amendments to your soil. Here at the farm we test with a number of laboratories to attain the best possible soils we can, but for the casual home gardener, this step is not as necessary.

You can also find a comprehensive, month-by-month list of tips for central Texas from our friends at The Natural Gardener.

Alright, you're ready to start planting, now what?

130218_SDG147305

Come to the Annual Transplant Sale

Our greenhouses are filling up with spring transplants for your backyard! This year's Transplant Sale will be held at our Garfield Farm greenhouses on March 5th and March 12th. Transplants will also be available for pickup at any of our farmers market locations and we're planning a fun pop-up sale with some friends of the farm!

Our selection this year includes tons of Tomatoes (heirlooms, cherries, traditional red slicers, paste tomatoes), tomatillos, sweet & hot peppers, basil, eggplant, squash, zucchini, watermelons, spinach, cilantro and more!

Learn from a Pro

Our very own farmer Brenton is the king of taking a backyard garden to the extreme. This March, he's going to share some of his knowledge to equip all you Central Texas gardeners with the education needed to make sure your families are well fed this year. Join us on Saturday, March 12th for the Organic Backyard Gardening Workshop w/ Brenton Johnson.

When: Saturday, March 12th 10 am  - 12pm

Where: Our Garfield Farm! 4008 River Road, Garfield TX, 78612

Tickets: Available now!

Brenton's teaching a gardening workshop - don't miss it! Brenton's teaching a gardening workshop - don't miss it!

Nitty Gritty:

  • This workshop is designed to equip Central Texas gardeners with the tools they need to plan and execute a successful spring vegetable garden, and is designed for novice and experienced gardeners, alike.
  • Topics will include: site selection, soil prep, soil fertility, irrigation, planting guidelines, variety selection, and pest management.
  • Workshop instructor will give useful, hands-on demos of proper planting, watering, and harvesting techniques, with a special focus on tomatoes.
  • Participants will have an opportunity for an open discussion and Q&A session with Brenton
 

Backyard Bonuses:
  • All workshop participants will enjoy 10% off their entire transplant order
  • Following the workshop, participants are invited to go on a walk-about with Brenton, where he will give a tour of a portion of the farm
  • All workshop participants are invited to bring a picnic and enjoy the Spring farmscapes
  • Participants will also receive a special discount to our CSA, as a type of crop insurance in case their backyard garden is less than bountiful :)
  • If you bring your kiddos, we will have a JBG volunteer there to bring them on a farm walk-about and some sand pile exploration

Sign up for the gardening workshop at jbgorganic.com/workshop - we've got a limited number of slots available!

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 8TH

02/09/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 8th CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 8th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Broccoli
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, White Japanese
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Onion, Spring Yellow
Small Box
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Herb, Dill
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, Scarlett
Individual Box
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Spinach
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 8TH

02/09/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 8th CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 8th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Onion, Spring Yellow

GRITS BREAKFAST BOWL

02/10/16 — Farm

IMG_3933

by Megan Winfrey

We are big breakfast fans in my house, like huge. It's my husband's favorite meal. He wanted our wedding food to be a breakfast buffet, which I wasn't exactly against! With that being said, breakfast can become monotonous. When you compare it to lunch and dinner, there are significantly less options when it comes to ingredients (which is my rebuttal when having the best-meal-of-the-day argument). What I have for you this week isn't so much of a recipe as it is a lifestyle suggestion. THE GRITS BOWL.

I have two of my cajun-belle gal pals to thank for introducing me to the wonderful world of grits. My college roomie, Ada, taught me how to make them (with butter and Tony's, always) and my childhood friend, Kathryn, taught me that you can, literally, put anything on top of them. What a perfect way to enjoy our JBG produce!

IMG_3931

My grits bowl consists of:
  • 1 serving of grits, prepared, stir in 1 tbs. butter and 1 tbs. Tony's Creole Seasoning
  • Scoop of prepared black beans
  • Half an avocado
  • 1/4 c. shredded cabbage
  • 1/4 c. chopped arugula
  • 1 egg, sunny side up

WEEK 6 IN PHOTOS

02/12/16 — Farm

Weeding the onions. Photo by Scott David Gordon Weeding the onions. Photo by Scott David Gordon

I know we start off this post each week talking about the weather - but can you believe this weather?! This might be the mildest winter on record at JBG and we are happy to keep seeing the sunshine and warm temperatures. Your vegetables sure don't seem to mind either. This week we're pushing full steam ahead to get our Spring crops in the ground. The planting crew has been working non-stop and we are grateful for their hard work and persistence. The greenhouse is full to bursting with crops for the farm and for your gardens as well - don't forget about our annual Transplant Sale just three weeks away! And thanks as always to Scott David Gordon for our photos this week.

Part of our amazing barn staff. Photo by Scott David Gordon Part of our amazing barn staff. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Doug is stoked about this week's CSA box. Photo by Scott David Gordon Doug is stoked about this week's CSA box. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Green cabbage harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon Green cabbage harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Meet Daniel, the face behind the farm email and front desk phone! Photo by Scott David Gordon Meet Daniel, the face behind the farm email and front desk phone! Photo by Scott David Gordon

Don't miss our Spring Transplant Sale coming up! Photo by Scott David Gordon Don't miss our Spring Transplant Sale coming up! Photo by Scott David Gordon

A pollinator visits some brassica flowers. Photo by Scott David Gordon A pollinator visits some brassica flowers. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Harvest mornings. Photo by Scott David Gordon Harvest mornings. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Tuckered out after a long day's work. Photo by Scott David Gordon Tuckered out after a long day's work. Photo by Scott David Gordon

The field crews are staying busy with this gorgeous weather getting spring crops into the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon The field crews are staying busy with this gorgeous weather getting spring crops into the ground. Photo by Scott David Gordon

A field of brussels. Photo by Scott David Gordon A field of brussels. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Mmmm. Photo by Scott David Gordon Mmmm. Photo by Scott David Gordon

CONSUMED SCREENING BENEFITTING FARMSHARE AUSTIN

02/12/16 — Farm

1cebb603cc7d2144283332cf61e82bd034cbe26b_358x535

Farmshare Austin is a local non-profit accelerating organic farming knowledge to scale food access in Central Texas. They need to sell just 28 more tickets to their screening in order to make the event a reality - we hope to see you there!

On Thursday March 3rd, join our friends from Farmshare Austin for a screening of Consumed, to be hosted at Regal Metropolitan 14.  Proceeds from the event will go to Farmshare to kick off their annual Amplify Austin campaign, so they need your support!

Consumed is a dramatic thriller that tells the complex story of genetically modified food. The story is anchored by a working-class, single mother on a hunt to uncover the cause of her son's mysterious illness. Interwoven are the stories of an organic farmer, the CEO of a biotechnology corporation, two scientists on the verge of a major discovery, and an ex-cop caught in the middle of it all.

Get your tickets today: http://gathr.us/screening/14128

A SECOND LOOK AT PLASTICS

02/12/16 — Farm

Katie drives the tractor for the transplanting crew. Photo by Scott David Gordon Katie drives the tractor for the transplanting crew. Photo by Scott David Gordon

From the Farmer's Perspective

I'm an all or nothing kind of guy - perhaps my best and perhaps my worst trait.  As I get older (and hopefully wiser), I'm slowly learning that things are not always as black and white as I like to see them, and it's helping me become a better farmer - there's a lot to be said for the middle path! In October 2014, we committed to reducing the our use of plastics at JBG. Our biggest use at the time was plastic mulch in the fields, so naturally, we decided to cut that out. I chose to go all in on this project, stopping our use of plastic mulch cold-turkey, and we learned a lot in the subsequent year. JBG hired a full time weeding crew to tend to our bare soils, and we worked as hard as we could to keep up the farm's productivity.

Hand-weeding is a tough task, and we've done a lot of it this year! Photo by Scott David Gordon Hand-weeding is a tough task, and we've done a lot of it this year! Photo by Scott David Gordon

My staff warned me that jumping in two feet first was a risky move, but I convinced them to push though. I'm incredibly proud of the work we've accomplished since then.  Without plastic, we've been battling waist high weeds with all of our efforts - and some serious man (and woman) hand labor.  As we are crop planning this year, however, we are re-evaluating our use of plastic mulch. I'm starting to see the more subtle pieces of our farm puzzle, and learning that things are not as black and white as I'd like them to be. This year, we have decided to use plastic mulch in a much more limited capacity, in order to deliver our customers the high quality produce they expect from JBG. For each and every crop, we are weighing the pros and cons of using this technology and making decisions as to where it is appropriate.

Plastic mulches have a lot of benefits in the agricultural world. They keep soil temperatures higher at night, which is very important for lots of our summer crops. We weren't happy with the quality of our peppers and tomatoes last summer, which was due in part to day-night temperature fluctuations. Plastics also drastically reduce weeds and prevent water, soil, and nutrient runoff - this is one lesson we learned the hard way with heavy rain events last year. For shallow rooted crops that do poorly with weed pressure, like our onions, the use of plastic mulch will save us thousands of gallons of precious water and hundreds of hours of hand weeding.

Onions are one crop that we will try again with plastic this year. Photo by Scott David Gordon Onions are one crop that we will try again with plastic this year. Photo by Scott David Gordon

And the plastic does wonders for our soil's microbial life.  It suppresses weeds, saving us many tractor passes over the soil and reducing compaction in the fields. Additionally, the dark and moist environment under the mulch, especially in our hot Texas summers, is the ideal environment for beneficial soil microbes. Without the mulch, the top layer of soil dries out and this biology is forced deeper and deeper to find a suitable home. High microbial activity in our upper soil layers has an additional, maybe less obvious benefit: like you and me, these microorganisms breathe oxygen and excrete carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide produced under the mulch seeps out through the holes punched for crops, bathing our plants in individual little clouds of carbon dioxide.  Along with giving our plants a nice big CO2 boost (like an oxygen bar for humans), we are reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by ensuring that our crops turn this carbon dioxide into oxygen instead of letting it escape into the atmosphere.

Newly planted brassicas. Photo by Scott David Gordon Newly planted brassicas. Photo by Scott David Gordon

So, it's time for me to stop seeing the world in black and white and start looking at the bigger, more complex picture. Yes, I want to reduce our use of non-renewable materials and am committed to keeping our use of plastic mulch to a minimum at JBG. We are exploring other alternatives to plastic, including strip tillage and natural mulches like hay.  But, we also have to take into account valuable resources like water and topsoil, which plastic undoubtedly helps to conserve.  Add in there our labor costs and workloads for the farm crew, which directly affect pricing for our customers as well. Have I mentioned it's not as straightforward as I originally thought? Plastic is still plastic, no matter how you spin it, but with so many things to take into consideration, there is no single right answer. Our hope is to find the best compromise in order to make the best decisions for our farm, our community, and our planet.

For more of the farmer’s perspective, follow Brenton on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram @farmerbrenton.

NOW HIRING: SERVICE TECHNICIAN

02/12/16 — Farm

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Position Title: Service Technician / Grounds Maintenance

Location: 9515 Hergotz Lane, Austin, TX 78742 Department: Maintenance

Reports To: Farm Manager, Operations Manager Supervises: N/A

Position Summary:

JBG Organic is seeking a service mechanic to assume responsibility for maintaining our fleet of 11 delivery vehicles including cargo vans, box trucks, and two 24 ft. refrigerated trucks. This position is also responsible for general farm facility repair and maintenance at our Hergotz location, which may include repair of 7 walk-in coolers, vegetable sorting machinery, and other equipment. The farm mechanic/maintenance works closely with the Farm Manager, Operations Manager, Cooler Inventory Manager, CSA Packing Manager, and Market Manager to ensure proper scheduling during our busy production time for performing repairs with minimal disruption to delivery and market schedules.

Responsibilities:
  • Communicate with Hergotz Managers for scheduling of maintenance
  • Perform preventative maintenance on all delivery vehicles and production equipment.
  • Maintain current vehicle inspections and registrations
  • Ensure proper fluid levels; replacement of air and oil filters; greasing bearings, etc.
  • Oversee implementation of inventory management and ordering
  • Obtain estimates for supplies, repair parts, and equipment
  • Respond to emergency maintenance requests when needed
  • Maintain safety during essential duties
  • Oversee general farm facility repair and maintenance
  • Maintain detailed records of repairs made and parts used
Qualifications:

Required
  • Skilled in the use of hand and power tools
  • Knowledge of basic gas diesel and small engine troubleshooting
  • Electrical knowledge through testing and replacing electrical components and wiring
  • Ability to troubleshoot various forms of equipment
  • Flexible scheduling needed to fulfill needs of the farm
  • Excellent judgment in prioritizing responsibilities
  • Excellent communication skills, effective in both a collaborative and independent setting
Preferred
  • Previous experience as a vehicle mechanic, particularly in a fast-paced environment
  • Spanish fluency
Physical Requirements
  • Ability to repeatedly lift 50 lbs
  • Ability to repeatedly kneel, bend, and squat
  • Ability to withstand exposure to varying weather conditions
  • Ability to withstand prolonged standing or walking
Schedule: Full-time, Monday-Friday 9-5

Compensation & Benefits: Compensation is dependent on experience. Expected salary range is $14/hr. Paid bi-weekly. Permanent employees are eligible for Individual Health Plan benefits.

Directions for Applying: Please send an email to jobs@jbgorganic.com with the following format. Following specific directions is the first way to impress us! Subject Line should read “[Job Title]: [First Initial]_[Last Name]” … For example, “Planting Crew Coordinator: J_Smith” Email body should be short & sweet - help us notice you! Ensure that it contains your contact information. Attach three documents to your email, ensuring that their file names are clear: 1) Cover Letter 2) Resume 3) List containing contact information of two professional references

Thank you for your interest in JBG Organic! You will be contacted for further information if we find that you might be a good fit for this position.

The responsibilities & duties listed above are intended to communicate general priorities of this position, but should not be understood as an exhaustive list of all work requirements to be completed at JBG Organic. Farms require flexibility! We are committed to training, developing, and promoting from within the company based on performance. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

GARDENING WORKSHOP BANNER

02/16/16 — Farm

gardening workshop banner correct size





 

NOW HIRING: WHOLESALE PACKING CREW

02/16/16 — Farm

Doug sprays the chioggia beets. Photo by Scott David Gordon Doug sprays the chioggia beets. Photo by Scott David Gordon

 

Position Title: Wholesale Packing Crew

Job Location: Austin, TX

Reports To: Wholesale Manager Supervises: N/A

Position Summary: JBG Organic is seeking an individual to join the wholesale packing crew. The wholesale packing crew will be responsible for washing, processing, and packing vegetables harvested on the farm. This position is also responsible for ensuring produce quality and compliance with health regulations. The packing crew will work closely with the barn manager and wholesale coordinators to guarantee that operations and orders are completed correctly and in a timely manner. All farm employees are expected to be courteous, demonstrate a strong work ethic and attention to detail. We take pride on the farm in producing the highest quality vegetables through quality work.

Responsibilities:
  • Receive, process, and package vegetables harvested on the farm
  • Maintain a clean and sanitary working environment
  • Ensure quality of all produce
  • Prepare and package wholesale orders
Qualifications

Required:
  • No previous experience required, only a desire to learn farm work.
  • Keen sense of detail and ability to apply this to packing standards.
  • A mantra that “Teamwork doesn’t seem work!”
  • Flexibility in work schedule, especially in ability to stay late when daily orders require.
  • Goal to burn the midnight oil and a willingness to work late hours.
  • Typical Schedule: Monday-Wednesday Typically 3:30 pm - 1:30 am; Thursday - Friday Typically 3:30 pm- 11:00 pm 
Preferred:
  • Previous experience in a warehouse setting, or with produce standards.
Physical Requirements:
  • Ability to repeatedly lift 50lbs
  • Ability to repeatedly kneel, bend, and squat
  • Ability to withstand exposure to varying weather conditions
  • Ability to withstand prolonged standing or walking
Schedule: Part-time. M-W 2:30pm-1:00am. Hours are flexible; some shifts may end later than 1:00am.

Compensation and Benefits: Compensation is dependent on experience. Expected salary range is $9.50/hr. Paid bi-weekly. Permanent employees are eligible for Individual Health Plan benefits.

Starting Date: ASAP - Can start immediately.

Directions for Applying:

Please send an email to jobs@jbgorganic.com with the following format. Following specific directions is the first way to impress us!

Subject Line should read “[Job Title]: [First Initial]_[Last Name]” … For example, “Planting Crew Coordinator: J_Smith”

Email body should be short & sweet - help us notice you! Ensure that it contains your contact information.

Attach three documents to your email, ensuring that their file names are clear:

1) Cover Letter

2) Resume

3) List containing contact information of two professional references

Thank you for your interest in JBG Organic! You will be contacted for further information if we find that you might be a good fit for this position.

The responsibilities & duties listed above are intended to communicate general priorities of this position, but should not be understood as an exhaustive list of all work requirements to be completed at JBG Organic. Farms require flexibility! We are committed to training, developing, and promoting from within the company based on performance. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 15TH

02/16/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contente Week of Feb 15th CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 15th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Dino
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Fennel
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Daikon
Turnip, Rutabaga
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Onion, Spring Yellow
Turnip, Purple Top
Small Box
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Herb, Cilantro
Kohlrabi, Purple
Potato, Sweet
Individual Box
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Spinach
Lettuce, Red Leaf
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 15TH

02/16/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 15th CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 15th

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Fennel
Herb, Parsley, Flat
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet

2016 TRANSPLANT BANNER

02/16/16 — Farm

Transplant Sale 2016 correct dates + size

FENNEL MAC N' CHEESE

02/16/16 — Farm

IMG_3995by Megan Winfrey

Is there truly anything better than mac n' cheese? I'm not talking about the stuff in the blue box - I'm talking about the rich, thick, ooey gooey, topped with bread crumbs, fancy cheese type of mac. The kind you'd willingly pay $15 for. If you're like me and have to order the house mac n' cheese at every new restaurant you try, than this recipe is for you. And if you're the kind of person who thinks mac n' cheese is just for kids, then this recipe is also for you - because my baby girl devoured it. But if you're the kind of person who doesn't much care for the combination of pasta, cream, and cheese...than I am so, very sorry.

Fennel Mac N' Cheese
  • 1 c. uncooked elbow noodles
  • 1 fennel bulb, chopped
  • 1 1/2 tbs. flour
  • 1 1/2 c. milk
  • pinch of black pepper
  • 1 tsp. sea salt
  • 1/2 tsp. nutmeg
  • 5 oz. fontina cheese, shredded
  • 4 tbs. parmesan cheese, shredded
  • 3 tbs. breadcrumbs
  • 1 tsp. paprika
  • olive oil
Prepare the pasta to al dente. While the pasta cooks, heat 1 tbs. olive oil in a pan and caramelize the fennel on medium for about 10 minutes. Stir often to keep from sticking. Set aside once finished. In the same skillet, add 2 tbs. olive oil on low heat. Add the flour, stirring constantly for about 2 minutes, to make a paste. Slowly whisk in the milk until all lumps are gone. Add the black pepper, salt, and nutmeg, then turn the heat up to medium. Whisk slowly to keep the mixture from burning on the bottom until it thickens. Add the fontina and 1 tbs. of the parmesan cheese, stir until smooth. Stir in the caramelized fennel. When the macaroni is al dente, drain it and stir into the cheese sauce.

Heat 1 tbs. olive oil over medium in a skillet. Add the breadcrumbs, remaining parmesan, and paprika, toss to coat. Brown on low for a few minutes, stirring often, until the breadcrumbs turn a deep brown and become crisp.

Spoon the mac n' cheese into a small dish, top with the breadcrumbs, and serve.IMG_3994

NOW HIRING: BULK CREW

02/18/16 — Farm

170112_SDG309287Position Title: Bulk Packing Crew  Job Location: Austin, TX

Reports To: Bulk Manager  Supervises: N/A

Position Summary: JBG Organic is seeking an individual to join the bulk packing crew. The bulk packing crew will be responsible for washing, processing, and packing vegetables harvested on the farm. This position is also responsible for ensuring produce quality and compliance with health regulations. The packing crew will work closely with various departments to guarantee that operations and orders are completed correctly and in a timely manner. When bulk needs are fewer, this individual may also help cover several restaurant delivery driver shifts. All farm employees are expected to be courteous, demonstrate a strong work ethic and attention to detail. We take pride on the farm in producing the highest quality vegetables through quality work.

Responsibilities:
  • Receive, process, and package vegetables harvested on the farm
  • Maintain a clean and sanitary working environment
  • Ensure quality of all produce
  • Prepare and package wholesale orders
  • Occasionally make restaurant deliveries in a safe and timely manner
 

Qualifications Required:
  • No previous experience required, only a desire to learn farm work.
  • Keen sense of detail and ability to apply this to packing standards.
  • A mantra that “Teamwork doesn’t seem work!”
  • Goal to burn the midnight oil and a willingness to work late hours.
Preferred:
  • Previous experience in a warehouse setting, or with produce standards.
Physical Requirements:
  • Ability to repeatedly lift 50lbs
  • Ability to repeatedly kneel, bend, and squat
  • Ability to withstand exposure to varying weather conditions
  • Ability to withstand prolonged standing or walking
 

Schedule: Full Time: M-F 7:00am-4 pm.

Compensation and Benefits: Compensation is dependent on experience. Expected salary range is $10/hr. Paid bi-weekly. Permanent employees are eligible for Individual Health Plan benefits. Full time employees also receive a weekly share of vegetables, and eggs on a bi-weekly basis.

Starting Date: ASAP - Can start immediately.

Directions for Applying: Please send us an email with the following format. Following specific directions is the first way to impress us! Subject Line should read “[Job Title]: [First Initial]_[Last Name]” … For example, “Planting Crew Coordinator: J_Smith” Email body should be short & sweet - help us notice you! Ensure that it contains your contact information. Attach three documents to your email, ensuring that their file names are clear: 1) Cover Letter 2) Resume 3) List containing contact information of two professional references Thank you for your interest in JBG Organic! You will be contacted for further information if we find that you might be a good fit for this position.

The responsibilities & duties listed above are intended to communicate general priorities of this position, but should not be understood as an exhaustive list of all work requirements to be completed at JBG Organic. Farms require flexibility! We are committed to training, developing, and promoting from within the company based on performance. This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

 

WEEK 7 IN PHOTOS

02/19/16 — Farm

Little romaine lettuces to be planted for Spring. Photo by Scott David Gordon Little romaine lettuces to be planted for Spring. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Another gorgeous week at JBG! We're staying on top of our work this week, seeding for our Transplant Sale and for the fields, harvesting loads of goodies for the busy farmers markets this weekend, and starting to take on a few new spring projects like tackling our grape trellises!

Chard looking great at the market. Photo by Scott David Gordon Chard looking great at the market. Photo by Scott David Gordon

A young customer checks out. Photo by Scott David Gordon A young customer checks out. Photo by Scott David Gordon

JBG's awesome market staff! Photo by Scott David Gordon JBG's awesome market staff! Photo by Scott David Gordon

JBG market customers. Photo by Scott David Gordon JBG market customers. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Making sure we're fully stocked on spinach! Photo by Scott David Gordon Making sure we're fully stocked on spinach! Photo by Scott David Gordon

Scott makes it out for sunrise at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon Scott makes it out for sunrise at the farm. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Early morning in the cilantro. Photo by Scott David Gordon Early morning in the cilantro. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Cilantro harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon Cilantro harvest. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Cilantro gets a close-up. Photo by Scott David Gordon Cilantro gets a close-up. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Artichokes are coming soon! Photo by Scott David Gordon Artichokes are coming soon! Photo by Scott David Gordon

We're keeping this flowering patch for a while - the bees are just loving it! Photo by Scott David Gordon We're keeping this flowering patch for a while - the bees are just loving it! Photo by Scott David Gordon

Lettuce enjoys a deep watering early in the morning. Photo by Scott David Gordon Lettuce enjoys a deep watering early in the morning. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Rows of romaine. Photo by Scott David Gordon Rows of romaine. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Kate and Katie staying busy in the greenhouse. Photo by Scott David Gordon Kate and Katie staying busy in the greenhouse. Photo by Scott David Gordon39

NOW HIRING AT JBG!

02/19/16 — Farm

Washing chioggia beets in the barrel washer. Photo by Scott David Gordon Washing chioggia beets in the barrel washer. Photo by Scott David Gordon

We've got spring fever right now, and with a huge spring season coming along, we're hiring!

We've got some amazing opportunities available at the farm right now. If you or someone you know is interested in organic agriculture and promoting a local food economy in Austin, we want to hear from you! Check out our current available positions:

Service Technician/Grounds Maintenance

PRE-ORDER YOUR TRANSPLANTS TODAY

02/19/16 — Farm

Rainbow chard. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Ready to take advantage of this gorgeous weather? Start planting your spring garden!

It's time to pre-order your certified organic transplants from JBG! Pre-order now to reserve your share of spring and summer favorites, from heirloom tomatoes and basil to table grapes and more.

Orders can be placed at jbgorganic.com/transplants for pickup at any of our farmers market locations beginning on March 1st.

If you want to pick out your plants in person, visit our Transplant Sale at the Garfield Farm greenhouses, 4008 River Road, Garfield TX 78612. The Transplant Sale will be held March 5th and March 12th.

121022_SDG133396 (1)



Not sure how to get started on your garden space? We're here to help!

Farmer Brenton is hosting our first ever Organic Backyard Gardening Workshop on March 12th. Sign up and get loads of insider tips on how to create a bountiful garden space for you and your family. Everything from site selection, varieties, soil health, pest management and more will be covered. Plus, workshop members receive discounts on their transplants!

Tickets are available at jbgorganic.com/workshop - hurry before space runs out!

FARM FRESH FRIDAYS AT AISD

02/19/16 — Farm

AISD Farm Fresh Fridays

Over 30 million students in our country rely on school meals every day, making the seemingly-humble school lunch an important meal - and an opportunity for us as farmers. With farm-to-school efforts taking off around the country, school lunches provide an important access point to these kids, not only nourishing future generations and fostering healthy diets, but also introducing students to food system, in general. Last week, JBG and AISD kicked off a HUGE project, one that has been in the works for months. We couldn't be prouder to announce that all 130 schools in the Austin Independent School District will be serving a healthy dose of JBG's organic carrots at school lunches for the next month (or longer!). We have so many people to thank for the successful launch of Farm Fresh Fridays and wanted to share the great news with you this week.

IMG_9138 JBG Carrots glazed with Herbs de Provence - Chef Louis Ortiz did not disappoint!

Scores of people have worked so incredibly hard to bring these carrots from our farm to the lunchroom table. It's hard to believe that the seeds for this project started way back in July! Our rock star wholesale manager Mike Mosley took on the project and has been guiding our farm through the process ever since. Though farm-to-school initiatives have been on the upswing for a number of years, we've learned over the past few months that getting local produce into school cafeterias can be quite a challenge! Why a challenge, you might wonder? Here's what AISD has to say about the hurdles: "The biggest challenges AISD has regarding farm-to-school are volume and delivery. Serving over 45,000 lunch meals each day at 130 campuses, most local farms are not able to accommodate the quantity and effectively distribute the products to each school. It is imperative that across the district, all students have access to the same healthy options."

Buying directly from local farms simply takes significantly more effort compared to usual district procurement processes. While some AISD distributors offer local options, the district went above and beyond when they decided to take us up on our offer to work directly with us - a local Austin farm. AISD Food Service Procurement worked with Mike Mosley, learning about seasonality, yields, and crop cycles along the way. After countless phone calls, emails, meetings, and visits, the team ultimately decided that carrots would be a great fit for Farm Fresh Fridays across the district - JBG loves to grow them, kids love to eat them, and they got the approval of AISD chefs and dietitians as well. Speaking of those chefs and dietitians: we were thrilled to learn about the meticulous process and forethought that goes into planning each school meal; AISD students are so lucky to have such a dedicated team making sure their meals are a power-punch of energy and nutrients to feed their growing minds and bodies.

Big thanks to the magnificent team who made Farm Fresh Fridays a reality! Celebrating with a healthy portion of school lunch at Govalle Elementary. Big thanks to the magnificent team who made Farm Fresh Fridays a reality! Celebrating with a healthy portion of school lunch at Govalle Elementary.

So, way back in July, we decided to plant a field of carrots in October, destined for lunchrooms around the city (in February!). When it came time for the carrots to be harvested just a few weeks ago, we nailed down the final number from the district - 3,000 lbs for each week of lunch service! Mike Mosely said he was floored. "When I saw the number, my jaw dropped. This has been such a huge effort for us, so I can't even begin to imagine how AISD is able to do this 5 days a week!" His coordination with the JBG crews was fantastic - we had to give our harvest crew a good warning, since each of these carrots (nearly 45,000) was pulled by hand at our farm! We also brought in two incredible volunteers to help wash and bag the carrots with our usual crew, working late on a Friday night to make it happen. The next challenge for us was getting the carrots to the lunchroom - 130 schools in a day is no easy feat for us. We're so thankful for our staff for rallying to make this happen; 4 JBG drivers came in on their day off in order to get these carrots delivered! Have we mentioned that this project is truly a labor of love for the farm?

Carrots fresh from our fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon Carrots fresh from our fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon

All of the work that went into this project culminated with a Meet the Farmer event at Govalle Elementary last week for the debut of Farm Fresh Fridays. As farmers, we don't usually have time to go and meet our customers, but we had to make an exception for this case. And we had a blast! Chef Louis Ortiz at AISD really knocked it out of the park with his recipe - Winter Harvest Carrots glazed with Herbs de Provence. Wow! It sure made us wish we were eating in this lunchroom every day. The kids at Govalle were so enthusiastic about the veggies and meeting the folks who grew them, and even sent us home with a sweet thank-you letter for our field crew. After months of work, being able to share in the fruits (and veggies) of our labor was really the cherry on the cake for us.

A note from the Govalle students to our field crew. A note from the Govalle students to our field crew.

So, to any AISD parents, we hope that your kids are enjoying their local veggies for the next 4 weeks! JBG carrots will continue to make their appearance on the menu, while some schools will also feature JBG beets and radishes on a made-to-order salad bar. You are truly lucky to be able to send your kids to school where food services is committed to "positively impacting Austin’s food system by continually incorporating more local options into their school menus." We loved to hear that this project is "helping [students] learn the benefits of locally-sourced food and gain closer community connection." We can't thank AISD enough for this commitment and what it means to us as farmers in Austin. If your child doesn't currently get a school lunch, consider switching over! According to the folks at AISD, "The more students fed each day, the more funds are available to spend on higher quality food. AISD is committed to increasing the use of local products, but needs participation to help support these initiatives." Local kids eating local veggies - who doesn't want to get behind that?

Farm Fresh Fridays! (1)

There are so many people whose work went into this farm-to-school project. Since we're getting a little long-winded and haven't begun to thank them all, we wanted to share with you a little graphic of everyone who was involved in making Farm Fresh Friday's a success. It truly takes a village - and this is one community we're looking forward to being a part of for years to come.

For more information on Farm Fresh Fridays:

TDA Farm Fresh Fridays Website

Sustainable Food Center: A Legacy of Fresh Food

KXAN: Ag Commissioner Sid Miller on Farm Fresh Fridays

 

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 22ND

02/23/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 22 CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 22

Large Box
Beet, Golden
Bok Choy
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Herb, Fennel
Kohlrabi, Purple
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, Purple Top
Medium Box
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Arugula
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Onion, Spring Yellow
Potato, Sweet
Turnip, Rutabaga
Small Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Collards
Greens, Spinach
Lettuce, Romaine
Onion, Spring Yellow
Turnip, Rutabaga
Individual Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Onion, Spring Yellow
Turnip, Purple Top

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 22ND

02/23/16 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 22nd CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 22nd

Medium Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Sprouts
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Onion, Spring Yellow
Turnip, Purple Top

CABBAGE STEAK WITH BALSAMIC GLAZE

02/23/16 — Farm

IMG_4119

by Megan Winfrey

There are moments in all of our lives that mark a dramatic shift in our perspective worlds. Something so life changing that you refer to other life events as happening before or after said moment. Before the baby, before we moved to Austin, and now, before I had my first cabbage steak. You're laughing, but I'm not joking. I used to think that for my last meal on earth, I'd have the highest quality seafood feast possible but now, I think I'll be switching to this.

Cabbage Steak with Balsamic Glaze
  • 1 head of cabbage
  • 2 cloves of garlic, crushed and roughly chopped
  • Salt and pepper
  • Olive oil
  • 1/2 c. Balsamic Vinegar
Heat oven to 400ºF

Slice the rounded edges off of either side of the cabbage, then slice the middle circle in half. One medium cabbage is good for 2 steaks. Line a baking sheet in foil. Generously cover both sides of the cabbage steak with olive oil, salt, and pepper and lay on the baking sheet. Divide the crushed garlic and top each steak with it.

IMG_4115

Bake for 30 minutes, until the edges are a crispy, golden brown and the garlic is also golden. While the steaks bake, make the balsamic reduction. Heat a non-stick skillet over medium-high. Pour in the balsamic and bring to a boil. Reduce to low, stir frequently, and let the liquid reduce by half. It should be thick and syrupy. Plate the finished cabbage steaks and drizzle with the balsamic reduction. Steak knife recommended!

IMG_4118

AISD'S GLAZED CARROTS WITH HERBS DE PROVENCE

02/23/16 — Farm

IMG_9138We were so excited about the AISD and JBG partnership (if you don't know what we're talking about, check out last week's blog post!), and we wanted to share in the spirit with our community, whether or not you've got kiddos in AISD. So, we asked Chef Louis Ortiz if he would share his recipe for those yummy carrots that kids across the district got to eat last week. Enjoy!

 

Hello from Louis Ortiz! Thank you for your interest in the carrot recipe and I hope that there will more to follow as we keep working with Johnson's Backyard Garden

1. 1 lb of fresh raw carrots washed, rinsed and peeled. Remove tops and root end and cut carrots into round coins (approx. 1/4 " thick)

2. Steam cut carrots for approximately 10 minutes and then chill in refrigerator immediately to stop the cooking process. You can also blanch the cut carrots in water at a medium simmer for 4-6 minutes and then remove carrots and plunge them into an ice water bath to stop the cooking process. Both methods "tenderize" the carrots and bring out the vibrant orange color.

*While the carrots are chilling, prepare a simple syrup using 1 cup water and 1 cup sugar in a sauce pan and bring to a slow simmer. Whisk the sugar & water mixture thoroughly while it simmers so that ALL of the sugar is absorbed/dissolved, then remove from heat and set aside.

3. Heat a sautee pan to medium high and melt enough margarine or butter to coat the surface. When margarine/butter starts to bubble and froth, add chilled carrots and keep stirring/moving them in the pan. The pan and heat should be hot enough that the carrots sizzle audibly during the sautee process.

4. After sauteeing carrots for 2-3 minutes, add 1/4 tsp Salt (+) 2 tsp Herbs de Provence and stir.

5. Finish by adding 1/3 cup of the simple syrup mixture and mix thoroughly to coat and shine!

WEEK 8 IN PHOTOS

02/26/16 — Farm

Washing carrots. Photo by Scott David Gordon Washing carrots. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Planting trees, building trellises and harvest trailers, keeping bees, harvesting lots and lots of greens. Week 8 was as busy as ever on the farm and we've got some great pictures to share with you this week. In addition to our usual farm activities, we had a blast hosting a Meet the Farmer event at Travis Heights Elementary School. Students had the chance to ask us all kinds of great questions about the veggies we grew for their lunchrooms (did you check out the carrot recipe we scored from AISD's Chef Louis Ortiz?). Enjoy!

Chard looking vibrant in the fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon Chard looking vibrant in the fields. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Harvesting chard. Photo by Scott David Gordon Harvesting chard. Photo by Scott David Gordon

A sign of spring? Photo by Scott David Gordon A sign of spring? Photo by Scott David Gordon

Montana gets some transplants ready for the field. Photo by Scott David Gordon Montana gets some transplants ready for the field. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Building a double curtain trellis system for our acre of table grapes. Photo by Scott David Gordon Building a double curtain trellis system for our acre of table grapes. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Grape trellises going in. Photo by Scott David Gordon Grape trellises going in. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Spring fields are looking great! Photo by Scott David Gordon Spring fields are looking great! Photo by Scott David Gordon

A field of lettuce with flowering brassicas in the background. Photo by Scott David Gordon A field of lettuce with flowering brassicas in the background. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Our three new bee hives, thanks to a partnership with St. David's Church. Photo by Scott David Gordon Our three new bee hives, thanks to a partnership with St. David's Church. Photo by Scott David Gordon

We're leaving lots of flowering crops in the field for our new pollinators. Photo by Scott David Gordon We're leaving lots of flowering crops in the field for our new pollinators. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Brenton and Roxy enjoying the sunshine in our cover crops. Photo by Scott David Gordon Brenton and Roxy enjoying the sunshine in our cover crops. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Transplants are ready for delivery starting next Tuesday! Photo by Scott David Gordon Transplants are ready for delivery starting next Tuesday! Photo by Scott David Gordon

These basil transplants are dying to go into your garden! Photo by Scott David Gordon These basil transplants are dying to go into your garden! Photo by Scott David Gordon

Kale for days. Photo by Scott David Gordon Kale for days. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Travis Heights Elementary has JBG kale on the menu this week! Photo by Scott David Gordon Travis Heights Elementary has JBG kale on the menu this week! Photo by Scott David Gordon

Fun with food. Photo by Scott David Gordon Fun with food. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Our CSA Manager, Ada, showing off a particularly silly sweet potato. Photo by Scott David Gordon Our CSA Manager, Ada, showing off a particularly silly sweet potato. Photo by Scott David Gordon

Photo by Scott David Gordon Photo by Scott David Gordon

Glazed carrots with Herbs de Provence - check our home page for the recipe from AISD! Photo by Scott David Gordon Glazed carrots with Herbs de Provence - check our home page for the recipe from AISD! Photo by Scott David Gordon

FARM HAPPENINGS + 4 CHANCES TO SNAG YOUR SPRING TRANSPLANTS!

02/26/16 — Farm

Montana waters a trailer full of transplants - order yours today! Photo by Scott David Gordon Montana waters a trailer full of transplants - order yours today! Photo by Scott David Gordon

We had to put in some heavy duty posts to support our rows of grapes! Photo by Scott David Gordon We put in some heavy duty posts to support these grapes! Photo by Scott David Gordon

We've got spring fever here at JBG! This warm weather has the farm bustling with projects for 2016, and lots of chances for you and your family to get in on the fun.

Our first big project of the week is sprucing up the acre of grapes we planted last year with a trellis system! In just another year or two, we hope these plants will be loaded with fruit, so we've designed heavy duty supports to hold up all that bounty! It's a huge project to get this installed, but with juicy grapes as a reward, we're happy to put in the labor.

The whole crew is also excited to see the farm's newest tenants hard at work - bees! Through a partnership with our good friends at St. David's church, the farm is now the home of three hives of honeybees. The bees have been enjoying the flowering crops we've left as pollinator habitat - these girls sure can carry a lot of pollen.

Jason and Bob loosen the strap around the beehive. Photo by Kathy Cramer Jason and Bob loosen the strap around the beehive. Photo by Kathy Cramer

160210_SDG270052 (1)

Want to get in on the Spring buzz? JBG wants you to plant your best garden ever in 2016!

We've got four great opportunities to pick up your certified-organic transplants from JBG, and right now is the time to plant! Here's how we can help:

160223_SDG272129

1. Let Brenton help you design the ultimate backyard garden

On Saturday, March 12, farmer Brenton is hosting an Organic Gardening Workshop at our Garfield Farm! Not only will he cover gardening topics from site selection, to varieties, to soil health, but you'll have the chance to consult with him on your own garden and how to optimize it for serious backyard production. The workshop is designed for new and seasoned gardeners alike.

Workshop participants receive special discounts on their transplants and on our CSA program (consider it your "crop insurance" for the year!) Snag your ticket ASAP to ensure a spot!



2. Visit the farm for our Transplant Sale - and maybe a picnic!

The Garfield Farm greenhouses are bursting at the seams with transplants for the farm AND for your garden right now. For the next two Saturdays - March 5th and March 12th - we're inviting you and your family to come out and shop the farm's After you stock up for your garden, stay and wander the farm - our bees and grapes would love to see you. Better yet - bring a picnic to enjoy with the family!

Our Garfield Farm is located at 4008 River Road, Garfield, TX 78612. See you next weekend!





160225_SDG272473 Photo by Scott David Gordon

3. Pop-Up Transplant Sale at Salt + Time - March 23rd

Our good neighbors and friends at Salt and Time are letting us dirty up their front porch, and on Wednesday, March 23rd from 3-7 pm, we're showing up with a truck load of transplants for this last-chance transplant sale!

You can pre-order here or by emailing the farm - Drink specials run from 4-7, and free of SPUN ice cream will be scooped for some selected shoppers. Your happy hour just got happier.



4. Pre-Order your transplants today - we'll deliver!

Deliveries start this Tuesday, March 1st for online transplant orders from JBG. Choose your favorite heirloom tomatoes, summer herbs, and maybe even throw in a fig tree or two. We'll deliver the makings for your spring plot straight to your nearest farmer's market! It doesn't get much easier than that.

Check out our great varieties and place your order on our Transplants Page.



Happy gardening from JBG!

160216_SDG270713 Photo by Scott David Gordon

 

2016 SPRING PICNIC BANNER

02/29/16 — Farm

2016 Spring Picnic 
OLDER POSTS