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LOCALLY GROWN, ORGANIC PRODUCE DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR.

TRANSPLANT SALE DETAILS!

02/24/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We have nothing but transplants on the mind these days. The 2017 JBG Transplant Sale is bigger than ever, and we can't wait to see your home gardens flourish. This year's selection is more varied and extensive than ever... we have 110 different fruit, herb, and veggie offerings including varieties from Slow Food’s Ark of Taste. Crazy, right? We have really begun to focus on diversifying our crop offerings over the past couple of years, with fruits on the forefront of this vast endeavor. We started pear, pomegranate, and fig orchards last year with expansion plans currently in the works, along with our table grapes (which will be readily available at markets this summer!). This year we are also planting a muscadine and persimmon orchard. We’ve spent a lot of time researching and scrutinizing what fruits will thrive in your backyard garden through colleagues’ fruit-ventures, our own experiments, plus poring over the subject with Texas A&M experts.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Through trial and error, we seriously believe that the crops that we have carefully selected are the best adapted varieties for your Central Texas backyard. We stand behind what we are offering the community 100 percent. The vegetable and herb transplants are all certified organic, while the fruit trees are GMO free (next year, we hope to grow all the fruit transplants and guarantee that they are certified organic).

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We have also spent a lot of time ensuring that our website is an effective and valuable resource for our community, especially with regard to the transplant sale this year. Just pop onto our site and peruse the massive menu of fruits, herbs, and veggies… we even have pecan trees for sale this year (the best two varieties, too!). We can deliver your transplant order straight to one of our farmers’ markets, or if you’re a CSA member - we can even deliver them to your house or to your regular CSA pickup location (just login to your account before ordering). If you end up coming to one of the March weekend transplant sales out at the Garfield Farm, you will be pleased to know that we will also be offering special organic soil mixtures, compost, potting mixes, plus tomato stakes and cages, too!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We know that starting or augmenting your backyard garden can be a daunting prospect, but we are here to help! Not only do we have some of the best backyard gardeners on staff, but our Greenhouse Manager, Brandon, will be leading a gardening workshop on March 11. This workshop is designed to equip Central Texas gardeners with the tools they need to plan and execute a successful spring vegetable garden, and is designed for novice and experienced gardeners, alike. We wrote a post last year prior to the 2016 transplant sale with invaluable tips about prepping your backyard garden for our transplants, check it out here. We also thought that this might be a good chance to inspire you with backyard gardens (and delicious harvests from said gardens) that we like to ogle from local edible gardeners and friends. Check ‘em out below!

Garden Inspiration:

The original Johnson's Backyard Garden. The original Johnson's Backyard Garden.

Michelle Treichel's garden. Michelle Treichel's garden.

Gardens by Blake. Gardens by Blake Chalfant.

Gardens by Blake. Gardens by Blake Chalfant.

Watch them grow!! #austinlandscapes #austinorganic #dailyharvest #justinesbrasserie

A post shared by Seedlings Gardening (@seedlingsgardening) on







Today's tomatoes, plucked just before the squirrels descended. #saucysolstice

A post shared by ada lisa broussard (@adalisab) on


WEEK 8 IN PHOTOS

02/24/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Despite having three inches of rain on Sunday, the soil finally dried out, and we were able to get some crops in the ground! The last of kale and fennel have been planted, so if kale salad is your jam, get to the markets this weekend before they are replaced with warmer weather crops! We will be seeing tomatoes and okra before you know it.

We had a super successful Meet Your Farmer(s) Happy Hour Wednesday night at Black Star Co-op. We loved mingling with our CSA community and lettin' loose with our colleagues. Join us for the next one in April at ABGB? Keep your ears and eyes peeled for more info on that soon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

CSA BOX CONTENTS WEEK OF FEB 20TH

02/21/17 — Scott

CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 20th CSA Box Contents Week of Feb 20th

Large Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Greens
Cabbage, Green
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Arugula
Greens, Kale, Curly
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Red
Turnip, Purple Top
Medium Box
Beet, Red
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Collards
Greens, Mustard
Greens, Spinach
Herb, Cilantro
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Onion, Green
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Black Spanish
Turnip, Purple Top
Small Box
Beet, Red
Brussels Greens
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Dandelion
Greens, Spinach
Lettuce, Mixed head bag
Radish, Green Daikon
Turnip, Purple Top
Individual Box
Carrot, Orange
Greens, Chard, Rainbow
Greens, Salad Mix
Greens, Spinach
Potato, Sweet
Radish, Purple Daikon

WHOLE LEMON SALSA VERDE

02/21/17 — Heydon Hatcher

salsa verde. mackannecheeseBy Mackenzie Smith

Like most of the volumes in my collection of Short Stack Editions, a couple of the recipes from Lemons, by Alison Roman, have been fully integrated into my repertoire of things I make over and over again. Roman’s whole lemon salsa verde is at the tip-top of that list. With olive oil, garlic, fresh herbs and a whole lemon, this zippy condiment snazzes up our weekly red beans and rice, brightens our turkey at Thanksgiving, makes a plain ol’ fried egg fancy and roasted vegetables sing, and it’s my #1 favorite topping for pizza after it comes out of the oven (or arrives at our door). Roman also suggests using this as a marinade for roasted chicken, a dressing for rice, and a dip for flatbread. Anywhere garlic and olive oil would be good, this verde wins.

The first time I made this recipe, I followed the instructions to a tee. These days, I know I’m going to want more than what the original recipe yields, so my version makes about 3 cups instead of 1 and a half, and I have managed to pack in even more green into this adaptation. Chances are, you will also find a way to make this one your own. When you do, take Roman’s original words of wisdom with you: “The key to using the whole lemon is removing all the seeds before finely chopping it: that’s where most of the bitterness comes from (you’ll still get a little from the rind, but that’s ok and even good)”.

salsa verde. mackannecheese-2

Whole Lemon Salsa Verde
  • 1 whole lemon, all seeds removed, finely chopped
  • 3 scallions, thinly sliced
  • 1 clove garlic, grated
  • 1½ cup olive oil
  • 3 cups parsley, very finely chopped
  • 1 cup cilantro, very finely chopped
  • ½ cup finely chopped other herbs such as mint, tarragon, thyme, or dill (any or all)
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper


Measure olive oil into a large bowl and whisk in garlic and scallions to infuse oil. Stir chopped lemon into the oil, then chop your herbs. Mix everything together and season with salt and pepper.

WEEK 7 IN PHOTOS

02/17/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

We finished planting onions this week, and we're working on getting tons of fruit trees ready for the transplant sale. We'll have several varieties of pomegranate, fig, grapes, pears, and persimmons for sale. This year’s line-up of transplant sale varieties are our best offering yet - there’s a ton of Ark of Taste varieties, and loads of tomato varieties, too. We also planted more carrots, beets, mustard, spinach, arugula, broccoli, cauliflower, last of the kale, and fennel this week in the fields.

Thanks to Scott David Gordon for another outstanding week of photographs.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Chucha. Photo by Scott David Gordon. Chucha. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

FROM THE FARMER'S PERSPECTIVE: TRANSPLANT SALE ON THE HORIZON!

02/17/17 — Heydon Hatcher

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

In case you missed it, our best and biggest transplant sale yet is quickly approaching! It’s slated for the first three weekends in March, and we cannot wait. The greenhouses are full of baby veggies, fruits, and herbs all ready for you to jumpstart that backyard garden. We have really begun to focus on diversifying our crop offerings over the past couple of years, with fruits on the forefront of this vast endeavor. We started pear, pomegranate, and fig orchards last year with expansion plans currently in the works, along with our table grapes (which will be readily available at markets this summer!). While this year we are planting a muscadine orchard, comprising of four black varieties, and planting a large number of persimmons. The muscadine enterprise is one that I hold close to my heart, as cultivating this specific crop is one that evaded me in the original backyard garden. I had 17 varieties of muscadine growing on a trellis system that existed on the periphery of the yard that failed to thrive. This crop prospers in acidic soil, and I have a couple ideas on how to get this fruit to successfully develop this time around.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

I have always had an affinity for growing fruits (we had plums, pears, loquats, limes, persimmons, and the aforementioned muscadines growing in the original backyard garden), but took an inexplicable hiatus until now. My once dormant fervor for fruit is wide awake and rarin’ to go now, though! Our transplant sale menu is epic this year: 40 tomato varieties, 4 kinds of squash, 20 kinds of peppers, okra, 20 types of herbs, bok choy, several types of lettuce, eggplant, cucumbers, figs, pears, grapes, melons, watermelon, persimmons, pomegranates, and satsumas! The second weekend, our greenhouse manager, Brandon, will be hosting a gardening workshop, too. Learn more about that here.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

Speaking of satsumas, I spent one day this week driving to West Columbia, TX to acquire some citrus trees, and to be honest, it felt like the middle of nowhere! Have you ever had a satsuma? It’s a cold-hardy mandarin that originated in China, but made it’s way west from Japan in the late 19th century. It’s a seedless, succulent, and wonderfully sweet (even sweeter when it’s cold) mandarin orange that thrives in lower Southeast United States. My father who lives in Enterprise, Alabama has a tree… and when I visited him for Thanksgiving, it looked like it was going to break in half it was so laden with satsumas. Fun fact: Satsuma, Alabama was named after this fruit, and is only two hours away from Enterprise. He kindly gifted me a tree a couple years ago, and it has been abundantly and unremittingly bearing fruit this season. I had so many that I delivered the bulk of the harvest to the farmers market for the community to enjoy!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

I digress, but my zeal for these new crops has me reeling. We have done so much research on the fruits that will thrive in our region, and are earnestly attempting to expand our offerings to you, our community, in your CSA box and also at our transplant sale. Most of the fruits that grocery stores offer and people love do not deal well with the Central Texas climate, so we are aspiring to provide native fruits to you. I deem the job of nurseryman as a noble role in the community, and feel very proud to be offering these fruits, veggies, and herbs. We feel that they are something of true value, and delicious to boot.

‘Til next time y’all!

Photo by Scott David Gordon. Photo by Scott David Gordon.

PS - If you are interested in volunteering at one or all of the three weekends of the transplant sale, email volunteer@jbgorganic.com with “transplant sale” mentioned in the title line. We would be so happy to have you!

We are also hiring for three jobs currently - if you want to get your hands dirty, work hard, and meet some cool folks, check out the listings here!

PURPLE TURNIP & GARLIC MASH

02/16/17 — Heydon Hatcher

unnamed-2By Megan Winfrey

The variety of turnips at JBG this year has been phenomenal! Not only are they beautiful and delicious, but each variety tastes a little different than the next. I love trying all of them raw before cooking with them, just to pick out the different flavor variations. It's like a less fancy wine tasting. My fail-safe is a turnip mash, and you can modify this simple recipe in so many ways. This recipe shows off the gorgeous color of the purple turnips and is wildly enhanced by my favorite vegetable - garlic. Enjoy!

Purple Turnip & Garlic Mash
  • 6-7 turnips, any variety, peeled and cubed
  • 4 cloves garlic, smashed and skins removed
  • 2 tbs. olive oil
  • salt and pepper
  • 1/4 cup whole milk
  • 3 tbs. butter


unnamed-1

Preheat the oven to 350ºF.

Place the prepared turnips and garlic on a baking sheet, drizzle with the olive oil, and season liberally with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for about 45 minutes, or until very tender.

In a blender or food processor, add the milk and butter. Carefully scoop in the roasted turnips and garlic, then blend on high for 1-2 minutes. The turnips can take some time to break down, so blend until it's smooth to your liking.

Season more to taste, and enjoy immediately. I served it with spicy venison sausage and a mustard green salad.
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